Apr 232014
 

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

It’s time again for my (this time only a bit late) monthly post for “Around the World in 12 Dishes,” the series in which each month participating bloggers travel the world with their kids by cooking a dish from another country and perhaps reading a book, doing a craft, or learning fun facts about it.

While soon I will be sharing a Portuguese dish we made, we had so much fun with our craft project that I wanted to share that first.  While doing research on Portugal, I ran across image after image of the beautiful glazed tile artwork called azulejos.  You can see for yourself these beautiful tiles in this photo essay of azulejos in LibsonAzulejos show the Moorish influence in the Iberian peninsula, and this can still be seen in the geometric designs of many of the tiles.

Well, we recently returned from our extended trip abroad, so I wasn’t ready to do any tile work with the boys.  Instead, I decided we would do some simplified versions with yarn, taking inspiration from the beautiful azulejos designs.

I came up with two methods, while Monkey invented a third.  All were fun!

Method 1:

Make a pattern on the paper with glue then press the yarn into it.  Resist the temptation to rub the glue all over your fingers (or not!)

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

Method 2:

Pour paint onto the paper and make a design using the yarn as a sort of brush.  Tip: Since the yarn is relatively thin, it won’t hold much paint.  Instead, either make a little bundle of the yarn and/or pour a generous amount of paint on the paper.

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.comThis was the method I used with Baby:

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

Method 3 (Monkey’s method):

Pour paint on the paper and use it as a glue for the yarn.  (Do not expect this to dry anytime soon!)

Yarn Art Three Ways: Portuguese Azulejos {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

 

Around the World in 12 DishesCheck out the other participating blogs to see what they have been cooking up:

Adventures In Mommydom, Afterschool for Smarty Pants, All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share, Maroc Mama, Creative World of Varya, Glittering Muffins, Kid World Citizen, Mermaids’ Makings, The Educators’ Spin On It and The Mommy Talks.

If you try a dish from Portugal, we’d love to hear about it! And don’t forget to download this month’s placemat and passport! You can also link up your dish or craft here to share your post on all the participating blogs:



Apr 212014
 
Below is the next installment in the popular series on Random Acts of Kindness. Each month, a blogger shares the random acts of kindness they have committed with their little ones. You can visit the Random Acts of Kindness page to see previous installments of this series. You can also follow the Random Acts of Kindness Pinterest Board. Today’s post comes to us from Jennifer of The Good Long Road, one of my favorite bloggers and a truly kind person who is making the world a better place.

 

Being Kind to the Environment and Each Other

 
 
I’m honored to be a part of this fabulous Random Acts of Kindness Series. I wanted to focus on Acts of Kindness inspired by Earth Day — acts that are kind to the Earth. Of course, there are the obvious things like picking up trash and recycling, but I also wanted to think creatively about being kind to nature/living things and connect that kindness to helping those around us. Here’s my Top 10 Creative Acts of Kindness for Earth Day!
  1. Help Someone De-Clutter – Offer to help an elderly neighbor sort through paper clutter and shred and recycle their excess paper for them. (Every time I would visit my grandmother, I inevitably ended up doing this — piles of old magazines, catalogs, newspapers and junk mail were everywhere!)
  2. Do Yard Work for a Friend or NeighborAt Pennies of Time, Sheila shared of how she and her two boys (at 6 and 4) weeded the yard of a friend who battles a chronic illness. Nurturing our environment through planting, weeding and gardening is a great way to help the Earth. Assisting others with green maintenance, who may struggle to do it for themselves, is a great way to RAK a friend!
  3. Organize a Recycling Project and Donate Funds from Bottles and Cans to Charity – Perhaps your school, community center, gym or a neighborhood gathering place lacks adequate or clear options for recycling bottles and cans. Set up proper containers to collect those items. Let kids make fun and colorful posters that make it clear that all funds raised from recycled items will go to charity. The Corner on Character shared a great book to encourage recycling and repurposing as well as activities to go with the book that would be great for a family or school. 
  4. Commit to a Birthday or Holiday limited to Thrift Sale/Yard Sale/Reused Gift Items Only - Our family began doing this at Christmas time when I was in High School, we could only give each other gifts that were purchased at resale or yard sales. I suspect much of the reason my parents did this was to save money and to remove pressure from a high school and college student who had little money of our own to get gifts for each other and our parents. It became a tradition that we loved – often keeping an eye out many months before for that “perfect” item. Shopping in this way reduces packaging waste and limits resources and pollution that are incurred when new goods are shipped around the world. 
  5. Walk, Bike or Bus to Work and School - On Earth Day, walk or bike or take a bus to school, work, the gym or the store instead of driving. See if you can commit to doing this once a week – swapping out driving with a more ecological mode of transportation. Perhaps one day will turn into two! If you’re a two-car family, you might discover you can manage with just one car – saving resources and money. (We’ve been a one car family in Southern California for years).
  6. RAK someone by giving them a reusable water bottle or coffee mug – Pick a coffee loving friend or teacher and have your children pick out a reusable coffee mug or iced coffee drink container to give them as a surprise RAK Gift! Or, if you know someone who often has a plastic bottle of water with them, RAK them with a reusable water bottle. 
  7. Visit your Local Farmer’s Market - Buying produce or other items (like goat cheese or honey) from a farmer at a local farmer’s market is a wonderful act of kindness for that farmer and for the Earth. Typically, items at farmer’s markets are often grown in much more sustainable ways than conventional produce. Plus, less resources are spent getting those items from Point A to Point B as almost every item sold at a Farmer’s Market will be locally grown. Farmer’s Markets also offer amazing opportunities for children to learn about fruits and vegetables. ALLterNATIVE Learning recently shared a great post about taking kids to the Farmer’s Market.
  8. Host a Local Food Party - Invite friends over for a unique dinner party – local food only. Ask each guest to bring one local food item. Again, buying locally is kind to the Earth because of the pollutants and resources that are saved because of minimal transport needs. Plus, breaking bread with friends is one of my favorite acts of kindness.
  9. Map Your Food - Kid World Citizen has a great post about mapping food and having kids learn about the world by seeing where their food is from. An activity like this also helps children learn how far some food can travel and is a great activity for Earth Day as you can extend it by talking about the resources (energy, oil, etc.) and resulting pollutants that are used in the process. It will help children (and yourself) understand the value of eating locally grown food when possible – or get them excited about growing food themselves. 
  10. Share Garden Goodies with Others - If you have a garden, put together a basket of locally grown food or a bouquet of flowers or herbs from your garden and share those goodies with a neighbor, perhaps someone who is housebound or on a limited income. By sharing your own locally grown items, you’ll brighten their day and are doing Mother Earth a favor too! (If you’re like me and you don’t have a garden, then pick up some extra items at the Farmer’s Market to give to a friend or neighbor). 
Jennifer is a mom of two, as well as an independent filmmaker who has taught filmmaking to youth, most notably with her Spotlight On Hope Film Camp, a free film camp for Pediatric Cancer patients. She writes about her experiences with Wild Thing and Caterpillar at The Good Long Road with an emphasis on mindfulness, imagination, and creative activities related to her toddler and preschooler’s favorite children’s books. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.
Random Acts of Kindness - Alldonemonkey.comYou can see a full schedule of the posts in this series by visiting the main Random Acts of Kindness Challenge page. You can also follow the Random Acts of Kindness Pinterest Board.


Apr 202014
 
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop #15 - Alldonemonkey.com
Hi, and welcome to the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop!
The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place where bloggers can share multicultural activities, crafts, recipes, and musings for our creative kids. We can’t wait to see what you share this time!
I am fortunate to be hosting this blog hop with three of my favorite blogging buddies, Frances of Discovering the World through My Son’s Eyes, Jody of Mud Hut Mama, and Kristin of Toddling in the Fast Lane.
It’s very easy to participate in this blog hop! Just follow these simple guidelines:
  • Be a sweetheart, and kindly follow your hostess and co-hostesses:
  • Follow us via email, Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook. Please let us know you’re following us, and we will be sure to follow you back.
  • Link up any creative kids culture posts, on anything from language, culture, books, travel, food, crafts, playdates, activities, heritage, and holidays, etc. Please, link directly to your specific post, and no giveaways, shops, stores, etc. When you link up your blog will also be shared simultaneously on our co-hostesses websites. :)
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
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  • Please grab the button code above and put it on your blog or the post you’re linking up. You can also add a text link back to this hop on your blog post. Note: By sharing your link up on this blog hop you are giving us permission to feature your blog post with pictures, and to pin your link up in our Creative Kids Culture Feature board on Pinterest.
  • Don’t be a stranger, and share some comment love! Visit the other links, and comment. Everyone loves comments!
  • The following blog hop we will each feature posts from the previous link up. If you’re featured, don’t forget to grab the button below:
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
<div align="center"><a href="http://alldonemonkey.com/category/parenting/raising-global-citizens/creative-kids-culture-blog-hop/" title="Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop" target="_blank"><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ajb4TxSmYlI/UTDtNW_oCLI/AAAAAAAAGOY/g-TYeax5flc/s1600/featured+culture+button+2-email+small+size.jpg" alt="Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop" style="border:none;" /></a></div>

 

Here are my picks from our last blog hop:

Navigating by Joy - Hands on Aztec History

We got a hands-on lesson about the Aztecs (including a chocolate taste test!) with Navigating by Joy.

Dad's the way I like it - Father and Baby Food Reviews

We got reviews of grown-up and baby foods in this hilarious post from Dad’s the way I like it.

Now let’s see what you’ve been up to!

Apr 172014
 

Spring Banners and Lazy Salt Dough Roses - Alldonemonkey.com

The Festival of Ridván is approaching, and each year I try to make it special for my kids.  This year, in addition to making a Ridván tent, I thought we should do some other decorations.  Since Ridván commemorates the time that Bahá’u’lláh spent in the Ridván Gardens outside of Baghdad, I wanted to do something with flowers.

Monkey loves play dough, so I thought he would really enjoy making salt dough ornaments – and boy, did he!  (Once I was able to tear him away from his Legos, of course).  The only problem was convincing him that we couldn’t eat them once they were done cooking :)

I found this wonderful two-part tutorial on salt dough ornaments from Tinkerlab, which includes a recipe.  As she mentions, you will probably not need the full amount of water indicated.Spring Banners and Lazy Salt Dough Roses {Ridvan} - Alldonemonkey.com

Monkey had fun rolling out the dough and doing the shapes with cookie cutters.  For the Bahá’ís in the audience, yes, you did spy some nine-pointed stars in there!  Those super cool nine-pointed star cookie cutters were an Ayyám-i-Há gift from Grandma this year from Special Ideas!

While Monkey worked the cookie cutters (and Baby played with some of the dough), I decided to try to make some roses to set on the counters.  You can find tutorials online to make beautiful, realistic roses, but I was looking for something easy that I could make while looking after my two little guys.

I used a technique similar to what I have seen others do to make paper roses: I cut a long strip out of the dough then rolled it up and pinched together the bottom.  They won’t win any contests, but Monkey took one look and said, “They’re pretty, Mommy.”  What more could a mama ask for?

Spring Banners and Lazy Salt Dough Roses {Ridvan} - Alldonemonkey.com

Once we were done, the ornaments went into the oven to bake on 25o F for just over two hours.  (Don’t forget to use a straw to make the holes so you can hang the ornaments later!)

After they had cooled, it was time to paint!  Monkey was very enthusiastic about this part as well.  I had in mind to do lots of pretty spring colors, but Monkey had other ideas.  Right away he spotted brown paint and declared he wanted to paint only with brown.  I decided to go with it, since the decorations were for him, after all – and because I had just realized how low we were on acrylic paints, meaning that I would need to use every spare drop we had, even the brown.  (For the record, he said he was making “chocolate” flowers).

Spring Banners & Lazy Salt Dough Roses {Ridvan} - Alldonemonkey.com

As it turned out, Monkey did move on to other colors – and we did run out of acrylic paint.  Luckily we had some finger paints, which worked out fine, although they are not as bright as the acrylics.

Spring Banners & Lazy Salt Dough Roses {Ridvan} - Alldonemonkey.com

We left them to dry overnight then in the morning threaded some pretty ribbon through the holes and hung up our spring banner.  I was happy with how it turned out but was over the moon with how excited the boys were about it.  Baby couldn’t stop pointing and “talking” about it, and Monkey kept dancing around shouting “Ornaments! Ornaments!”

Spring Banners & Lazy Salt Dough Roses {Ridvan} - Alldonemonkey.com

Spring Banners and Lazy Salt Dough Roses - Alldonemonkey.com

Spring Banners and Lazy Salt Dough Roses - Alldonemonkey.com

Happy Ridván to those of you celebrating, and to the rest, Happy Spring!

 

For more ideas for celebrating Ridván, be sure to check out last year’s collaborative series Walking Through the Garden of Ridván.

Apr 152014
 

Baby Shower Favors {Multicultural Kid Blogs Virtual Baby Shower} - Alldonemonkey.com

This post is part of the Virtual Baby Shower being held at Multicultural Kid Blogs.  For more details and to share your own posts, see the bottom of this page.

It seems incredible to me that it has been nearly a year and a half since my baby shower for Little Monkey; yet, when I try to remember our family without his dimpled grin and bright spirit, it seems a lifetime ago.

Today I am sharing the favors I made for his baby shower, inspired by a quotation that to me encapsulates all the hope we carry for the new little beings that enter into this world and the joyous burden that falls to us as parents to help them reach their potential:

“Every child is potentially the light of the world.”        

- Bahá’í Writings

To make these I first create the template in Publisher (download the pdf version here) then printed them on cardstock.

Baby Shower Favors {Multicultural Kid Blogs Virtual Baby Shower} - Alldonemonkey.com

These make lovely cards as is, but I wanted to send everyone home with a little something special, so I simply glued a scented tea light onto each.  I kept several for myself, and they still smell heavenly!

Baby Shower Favors {Multicultural Kid Blogs Virtual Baby Shower} - Alldonemonkey.com

 

Multicultural Kid Blogs - Virtual Baby ShowerAt Multicultural Kid Blogs, we consider ourselves a (very large) extended family, and so today we are taking time to celebrate those members that are about to or have recently welcomed new little ones into their lives. We are so happy for them!

The co-hosts of this blog hop, listed below, have each written posts related to baby showers or more generally about becoming parents, plus we’d love for you to link up yours below.

Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to leave your advice and well wishes for our guests of honor!

Co-hosts

the piri-piri lexicon
Vibrant Wanderings
Creative World of Varya
La Cité des Vents
Spanish Playground
Dad’s the way I like it
Tiny Tapping Toes
All Done Monkey

 


Apr 102014
 

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

As many of you know, we just returned from a wonderful trip to visit family in Costa Rica.  While we were there, we were able to take our little volcano lover to visit two of the active volcanoes in that country, Poás and Irazú.

As a result, I thought this would be a good time to share a fun volcano craft we did a few months ago.  The Monkeys and I actually did it for my husband’s birthday, but it would also work perfectly for Mother’s Day or Father’s Day.  It’s easy to do with one child but also makes a great keepsake for siblings, as shown here.

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

We used red and yellow paint for the lava.  Red had the best effect, although yellow turned out okay on the white paper.  If you are doing two or more kids, be aware that the yellow will not show up very well on top of the red, so it is better to either separate the hand prints a bit or do both in red.

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

While Baby was napping, Monkey and I sat down to do step one.  I painted his hand red then made his hand print in the upper half of the paper.  (We did two versions just in case, since this was an experiment!)

Later in the day I painted Baby’s little hand and did my best to do a hand print with them.  He really had fun with the paints!

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

Finally, I added the mountain below so that the hand prints look like lava exploding out of the volcano.  An older child could also do this step.  (Monkey was “too busy working” with his legos at this point so suggested that I do it).

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

Hand Print Volcano Card - Alldonemonkey.com

I was the only one who thought my humor was funny, but since I had the pen it didn’t really matter lol ;)

Have an explosive day and always remember that we lava you!

 

 

 

Apr 022014
 

Lessons Learned from Language Learning - Spanish Playground on Alldonemonkey.com

Today’s post comes to us from a very dear friend, Jennifer Brunk.  Jennifer writes about language learning and resources for teaching children Spanish on Spanish Playground.

What do children learn as they acquire a second language? Vocabulary, grammar, culture, history, geography… All of these, no doubt, but there are other lessons that come with learning language, too.

I believe that learning a second language shapes children and their view of the world. These benefits may be harder to define than higher test scores or job opportunities, but they are just as important and lasting.

As children acquire more than one language, they learn:

The point of language is to understand and be understood. To be successful, children must learn to listen and be respectful of others.

Languages, cultures and interactions are complex. Children understand that their perception is not the only one possible, because it is interpreted and expressed slightly differently in each language. As they learn two languages, children see that there is a lot they don’t see. They learn to be open to exploring a situation, rather than making assumptions.

Variation is a given. Native speakers of the same language say things differently. Living this reality in more than one language helps children internalize that different is not a question of right and wrong.

Content is more important than form or presentation. Children learning two languages learn to listen for ideas. They focus on the message rather than being distracted by accent or appearance.

Language is powerful and it is a privilege to speak more than one. They can understand that they have a responsibility to use their skills to help others. They learn to appreciate the power of words and to use them carefully.

The globe is theirs to wander and absorb. They learn that each language brings new territory to explore and that when they can’t travel, language will transport them through stories, movies, and music.

Learning never ends. They are aware of what they know in one language and not the other and understand that they will keep learning their entire life.

Photo Credit: David Light Orchard via Compfight cc

Spanish Playground

Jennifer raised her three children speaking English and Spanish, and she has been teaching Spanish to other young world citizens for over twenty years. On her blog Spanish Playground, she shares resources for parents and teachers of Spanish language learners.

Mar 312014
 

Iceland: Pancakes, Chocolate Soup, and Geysers {Around the World in 12 Dishes}

It’s time again for my (this time only a bit late) monthly post for “Around the World in 12 Dishes,” the series in which each month participating bloggers travel the world with their kids by cooking a dish from another country and perhaps reading a book, doing a craft, or learning fun facts about it.

This month we visited Iceland.  When we pulled out our children’s atlas, of course my budding geologist spotted the volcano and geysers right away.  He has studied quite a bit about volcanoes, so I thought it would be fun to explore about geysers.  We talked some about how they are related to volcanoes then I found some videos online showing actual geysers.  Here is one of the Strokkur Geyser.

Monkey and I got a big kick out of Little Monkey’s reaction to the video.  His eyes got huge, and he cried out “Agua!  Agua!  Aguaaaaaa!”

I showed Monkey some of the recipes I found for Iceland, and no surprise he opted for pancakes and “chocolate soup” rather than fish stew :)

Both were big hits.  Icelandic pancakes are quite a bit like crepes.  I did not alter the recipe I found, so I won’t repeat it here.  They should be very thin and are often enjoyed stacked, sometimes with a filling.  If you are used to cooking the thicker pancakes we make in the US, be careful not to burn them, as these cook much more quickly.  (Not that I speak from experience, ahem).  They would go great with maple syrup!

Iceland: Pancakes, Chocolate Soup, and Geysers {Around the World in 12 Dishes}

The chocolate soup was also delicious.  The spices smelled just heavenly.

 

Iceland: Pancakes, Chocolate Soup, and Geysers {Around the World in 12 Dishes}

I have to admit doubling the amount of sugar for Monkey, who really wanted hot chocolate.  I was curious that the website said that this is often served as a main course, but it made more sense once I realized that it isn’t very sweet.  I remember when I was in Bolivia that a cup of chocolate would often be served as dinner in many poor households.

Iceland: Pancakes, Chocolate Soup, and Geysers {Around the World in 12 Dishes}

Well, ours was served as a delicious afternoon snack with perhaps a few marshmallows, but we still learned about geysers, didn’t we?

What have you been cooking with your children lately?

Around the World in 12 DishesCheck out the other participating blogs to see what they have been cooking up:

Adventures In Mommydom, Afterschool for Smarty Pants, All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share, Maroc Mama, Creative World of Varya, Glittering Muffins, Kid World Citizen, Mermaids’ Makings, The Educators’ Spin On It and The Mommy Talks.

If you try a dish from Iceland, we’d love to hear about it! And don’t forget to download this month’s placemat and passport! You can also link up your dish or craft here to share your post on all the participating blogs:



Mar 262014
 
Today’s post comes to us from my good friend Jaime of Frogs and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails.  We have a lot in common, including a love of easy, delicious family dinners! 
I love my Crock Pot!! Without it, many nights we would not eat. The kids might enjoy that because it would be popcorn and yogurt every night, lol. I love being able to put everything in it in the morning and walk away and come back later to a meal ready to eat.  The Potato Corn Chowder with Ham is just one of our favorites.
Potato Corn Chowder with Ham~ crock pot dinner
 

Continue reading »

Mar 242014
 

Maple Syrup Fudge from Canada {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

This post contains affiliate links.  This means that if you click through and make a purchase on Amazon, I receive a small commission.  We appreciate your support!

It’s time again for my (once again, very late) monthly post for “Around the World in 12 Dishes,” the series in which each month participating bloggers travel the world with their kids by cooking a dish from another country and perhaps reading a book, doing a craft, or learning fun facts about it.

I was so excited to see Canada on our schedule.  Not only is Monkey’s perennial favorite Caillou from Canada but so is maple syrup, a recent fascination of his thanks to another virtual friend – Curious George!  Yes, I like to think my husband and I are major influences on Monkey, but the truth is that all he really seems to absorb is what comes from a favorite character (or his preschool teacher).

Ever since Curious George visited a sugar shack (where the sap from a maple tree is turned into syrup), my Monkey has been very curious as well to try maple syrup!  (Btw if you don’t want to invest in a big bottle of maple syrup, our local Target sells small 100 mL bottles that are perfect for quenching your child’s curiosity without breaking your bank).

To get us in the mood, we found some great books about maple syrup.  The first, Maple Moon, is a really beautiful book based on common native legends about the origins of maple syrup.  In this story, a young boy who often feels left out because of a handicap ends up saving his village from a difficult winter when he discovers the golden syrup.

 

 

 

A much lighter book is Pancakes for Supper.  It is all about a quick-thinking pioneer girl’s adventures in the woods amongst the wild animals when she is accidentally bounced out of her parents’ wagon.  I was worried it would be a bit too S-C-A-R-Y for Monkey, but he had fun seeing her convince the animals to put on her brightly colored winter clothes (in exchange for not eating her!)  What does this all have to do with maple syrup?  Well, not too much, except that in the end her parents are so happy to see her again that they all eat pancakes (with syrup!) for supper.

 

 

When the time came to choose a recipe with maple syrup, my problem was narrowing down all the options!  Since we were busy getting ready for a family trip, I decided to go with something easy, this delicious maple syrup fudge, a traditional treat from Quebec.  (Many thanks to Valerie of Glittering Muffins for sharing the link!)

But before we got started, Monkey and I first did a taste test.  I lined up bottles of honey, agave nectar, and maple syrup then had him close his eyes (quite a task for a curious 4 year old!)

Maple Syrup Fudge from Canada {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

As it turned out, to the untrained little tongue it can be difficult to tell the difference among these!  In particular he kept mixing up the agave nectar and the maple syrup, perhaps because of the similar consistency and because he is less familiar with them than he is with honey.  But the funniest part was when he gave his opinions about how they could be improved: “Needs more salt!”  “Add a little milk.”  (I think he thought he was Anatole the mouse, leaving notes on wedges of cheese!)

Once we determined that he loved all of them, it was time to make our maple syrup fudge.  I have to confess here that this was made while packing for vacation, while trying to keep my toddler from dismantling the kitchen, so it didn’t quite turn out as beautifully as in the original.  But let me tell you, the taste was still wonderful!  I mean, let’s be honest: any recipe whose principal ingredients are maple syrup, butter, and cream just can’t turn out wrong.  (I apologize for the quality of the picture – as I said, we were packing for vacation!)

Maple Syrup Fudge from Canada {Around the World in 12 Dishes} - Alldonemonkey.com

The original recipe is in French, so I am including below an English version (courtesy of Google Translate) with my notes about substitutions.  Enjoy!

Maple Syrup Fudge (Quebec)

Ingredients

500 ml (2 cups) maple syrup
45 ml (3 tbsp.) Unsalted butter
250 ml (1 cup) 35% cream (For the cream you can also substitute 3/4 c of milk and 1/3 c butter – a bit more butter if you are using low fat milk)
5 ml (1 tsp) Vanilla

Preparation

  1. Line a loaf pan with parchment paper.  (I just greased a loaf pan).
  2. In a saucepan, pour maple syrup and butter.  (If you are substituting milk and butter for the cream, add that butter at this time)
  3. Bring to a boil, then simmer for five minutes.
  4. Stir in cream (or milk) and cook until the temperature reaches 118 º C (245 º F) on a candy thermometer.
  5. Let stand five to eight minutes.
  6. Stir the mixture with an electric mixer ten minutes at high speed.  (I skipped this step because my littlest was tired and ready for bed, but it really does make a different in blending the ingredients together to make creamy fudge).
  7. Pour into mold and refrigerate before cutting.

 

What have you been cooking with your children lately?

Around the World in 12 DishesCheck out the other participating blogs to see what they have been cooking up:

Adventures In Mommydom, Afterschool for Smarty Pants, All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share, Maroc Mama, Creative World of Varya, Glittering Muffins, Kid World Citizen, Mermaids’ Makings, The Educators’ Spin On It and The Mommy Talks.

If you try a dish from Canada, we’d love to hear about it! And don’t forget to download this month’s placemat and passport! You can also link up your dish or craft here to share your post on all the participating blogs: