Dec 292015
 

5 tips to encourage diversity in the classroom by fostering friendships

Fostering friendships among students is an important part of supporting diversity in the classroom.  Today’s tips on how to do this are brought to you by Amy of The Gifted Gabber, an experienced English as a Second Language teacher.

As an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher, I love watching friendships blossom between young people from all over the world. Watching a friendship grow is always a magical thing to observe but even more so when the parties involved come from different walks of life.

It’s not hard to reason that Mexican students might find it easy to befriend one another in an ESL class in the United States, or that two students from India might form a bond when placed in a class together on the other side of the world. It would also be reasonable to think that the life of an immigrant student would be a lonely one – at least for the first few months in a new school. In my experience, newcomer students seem more willing to engage with students of different colors, languages, and backgrounds. Maybe this tolerance towards diversity stems from a place of loneliness, but it’s a good thing, regardless.

One of the most entertaining friendships I observed began five years ago when two young ladies – both looking lost – entered my ESL classroom on the first day of their sixth-grade year. One’s native language was Vietnamese, while the other spoke Gujarati and Hindi. Neither could communicate verbally with the other at first. Yet, a week into the school year, they were fast friends.

The student from India had learned a bit of formal English before coming to the U.S., and the student from Vietnam knew none. However, the two managed to communicate and figure each other out. And their open attitudes did not end there, as they also extended friendship to the Guatemalan, Iraqi, Mexican, and Filipino students in the class. To boot, I often saw them in the halls between classes, interacting and laughing with American students. Just as these girls embraced a new land, they welcomed any and all friends that came along with the deal.

I can’t tell you how many laughs I had over the next three years with these two sidekicks in my class. They bickered like sisters. They giggled together like sisters. They wanted to outdo each other like sisters. They defended each other like sisters. In short, they were sisters: sisters who found themselves together in a new world with new curiosities and new beginnings.

Considering this pair, I pondered some things that teachers can do to foster open attitudes and new friendships within an ESL classroom or any classroom with cultural diversity. I brainstormed the following list with some of my former ESL students.

Diversity in the Classroom: 5 Ways to Foster Friendships

  1. Make time for the fun stuff. A former student told me that one of the best memories she has was playing board games in class every Friday. During this 20 minutes of free time, my only rule was that the games had to be played in English so that no one felt left out. For instance, if the small group had two students from Mexico, one from Honduras, and one from Vietnam, they should not speak Spanish as that would isolate the Vietnamese student. Instead, they were encouraged to communicate through their limited English. Something about the challenge and the friendly competition seems to help create a bond with students.
  2. Assign projects which incorporate information about the home countries or home languages. Students love to show off their homeland to others. In fact, kids love to talk about themselves in general. Remember participating in show and tell, anyone? I find students gain more of an appreciation and curiosity for a country when a student from that country presents the information. Of course, these types of projects have to be created and assigned with the students’ individual communication levels in mind.
  3. Partner new students with trustworthy “nice” kids. Once, I made the mistake of partnering a new Korean girl with another young lady who I didn’t really know simply because they shared a homeland and a language. The other girl had moved to the U.S. as a young child and was very “Americanized.” It turns out, she was rather rude to my new student and snubbed her when her friends were around. I learned it is better to choose a welcoming and friendly classmate even if there is a language barrier than to choose someone simply because they share a culture or a language.
  4. Design curriculum around small-group discussions. Allowing students to participate in small groups in which personal thoughts and opinions are exchanged allows students to gain a sense of who the other students are and how they think. This helps the students identify connections they may share with others.
  5. Lead by example. Greet students in their native language or attempt to learn basic vocabulary words.  Ask questions. Have them show you things about their home using Google images or Google Earth. Make a point to let all the students see your interest in the students, bringing focus to the value they bring to the group. As unfortunate as it is, many students grow up in homes with parents who do not demonstrate an acceptance for diversity. Showing your students how interesting it is to embrace other cultures and languages will speak volumes. Once you model this interaction regularly, they will want to interact and learn more about the new students, too.

These tips will help teachers establish an environment for friendships between students of any culture, but they can be modified for parents who wish to encourage global friendships for their own children. For instance, if your child plays on a soccer team with some children from Costa Rica, you can make an extra effort to learn some of the Spanish words used in soccer. Likewise, you can invite some neighborhood Russian children over for an afternoon play date of board games. You might even ask them to teach your family how to play some of their favorite Russian games.

Year after year, my ESL students have taught me the same lesson – friendships are out there for the taking, no matter the diversity of the individuals involved. Language barriers and land borders are no match for the quest for friendship.

Amy is a wife, mom, and Spanish/ESL teacher in Little Rock, Arkansas. At The Gifted Gabber, she blogs about mommy-and-me fashion, thoughts on teaching, bilingual parenting, recipes, and home life. Proud of her Panamanian-American heritage, she loves to adorn her closet, her kitchen, and her classroom with global touches.

Dec 152015
 

Las Posadas: Creamy Avocado Salsa Recipe | Alldonemonkey.com

With the arrival of our newest bundle of joy last month, we are keeping things simple in our house, especially when it comes to cooking.  At the same time, however, we don’t want to sacrifice taste or comfort, which is why I love this creamy avocado salsa recipe.  So easy, but a real treat for all of us!

This recipe is special because it also celebrates Las Posadas, the wonderful Christmas tradition from Latin America that recreates Joseph and Mary’s search for shelter before the birth of Baby Jesus.  This festive time is one of joyous gatherings of family and friends, filled with laughter, song, and – of course – great food!

This tradition is especially poignant for our family this year, as it celebrates community and family, two things that are of particular importance when a child is born.  We live far away from our families: mine is scattered throughout the US, while my husband’s is in Costa Rica, distances that seemed even greater as our due date drew near.  And while our families did their best to support us (last minute plane trips, Skype, packages of presents), we knew we would be leaning heavily on friends when our little girl arrived.

And so it was.  Friends and neighbors babysat as we went to the birth center: one dear friend responded to a desperate text at 5 am, while another cheerfully spent all day with our boys.  In the days that followed, women from my moms’ group – some of whom I had never even met before – dropped off hot meals, while other friends offered to take our older children out for play dates.  Blogger friends sent guest posts and gave my articles extra love.  My personal inbox and Facebook page were flooded with well wishes and offers of help.

In short, our family – including our new little one – was surrounded with love and support, at a time when we sorely needed it.  And that is what Las Posadas represents to me: a celebration of community, as people come together to provide shelter and support to those in need.

HERDEZ® is encouraging this wonderful tradition by sharing favorite recipes and traditions, plus a contest! (See details below).  Here is an easy holiday recipe made with HERDEZ® Salsa Verde, perfect for Las Posadas or other holiday celebration.  Even for busy families like ours, it is easy to put together!

Las Posadas: Creamy Avocado Salsa Recipe | Alldonemonkey.com

Avocado Salsa Recipe

2 ripe avocados

1 & 1/4 to 1 & 1/2 cup, HERDEZ® Salsa Verde

Dash of lemon juice

Mix all ingredients well in a blender.  Adjust proportions as needed.  Enjoy as a dip or as a topping for tacos.  I’ve even seen it used as a sauce for pasta!

Las Posadas: Creamy Avocado Salsa Recipe | Alldonemonkey.com

How are you celebrating with your loved ones this holiday season?

Las Posadas Instagram Contest

As this holiday brings family and friends coming together enjoying food and celebrations, HERDEZ® brand is holding a photo contest on Instagram. The Share in the Magic of #MisPosadas contest lasts from December 7th – January 6th.

Each week, a fill in the blank question relevant to the holiday will be posted for fans to answer with a photo. Three top winners will be selected as well as honorable mentions. Prizes are as follows:

– Grand Prize: Dinner prepared by a personal chef for up to 4 people in your very own home!
– 2nd Place: $250 Gift Basket
– 3rd Place: $200 Gift Basket
– Honorable Mention: Custom T-shirts

To enter, submit a photo on Instagram with the hashtag #MisPosadas to answer the weekly fill in the blank question.  Visit  HERDEZ® on Instagram to play along!

Dec 032015
 
 December 3, 2015  Christmas, multiculturalism, raising world citizens Comments Off on Christmas Around the World: When to Celebrate

Christmas Around the World: When to Celebrate | Alldonemonkey.com

When is Christmas celebrated where you live?  Do you know why many countries celebrate on December 25 (and why others do not)?  Thanks to Carrie of Crafty Moms Share for teaching us more about this fascinating aspect of Christmas around the world.

Christmas Around the World: When to Celebrate

The Bible does not tell us when Jesus was born. No one actually knows the date of his birth. The first recorded Christmas on December 25th was in 336AD. It was during the time of Roman Emperor Constantine, the first Christian Roman Emperor. A few years later Pope Julius I declared Christmas Day to be December 25. There are many theories as to why this date was chosen. One theory is it is nine months after the date of Annunciation, when it is believed Mary became with child (March 25). Another is that it is around the pagan celebration of the Winter Solstice as well as other Roman pagan festivals. The Jewish Festival of Lights, Hanukkah, begins on the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev (a month that often occurs at the same time as December) and since Jesus was Jewish, perhaps it was to honor his past.

In the early church Christmas was also celebrated on January 6th, also known as Epiphany (the revelation that Jesus is God’s son and the Baptism of Jesus). Then there is the switch of the calendars from the Julian to the Gregorian, though some churches still use the Julian calendar. All of this affects the date of Christmas and various countries celebrate Christmas at different times. There is also the question of what is the Christmas celebration? Is it when Santa Claus or other gift bearer brings gifts to children? Is it when families gather for the celebration or when people go to church? Each of these things also occur at different times in different cultures.

In Venezuela some people begin their celebrations with St. Barbara’s Day on December 4th. On December 16th families bring out their pesebre, elaborate nativity scenes, and the height of the celebrating begins on December 21st and lasts through the 25th. Epiphany or Three Kings Day is also celebrated in Venezuela. The main presents arrive Christmas Eve.

In the Netherlands December 5th is a big date. December 6th is St. Nicholas Day; however, in the Netherlands there are major celebrations on the 5th. The kids leave out their shoes for Sinterklaas to fill with gifts during the night. Then there is a large parade on St. Nicholas Day. Christmas is a much quieter event with church and a family meal.

Mikulas a cert v Praze (1)
Traditional St. Nicholas Celebration in the Czech Republic By Chmee2 (Own work)[GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Many countries celebrate St. Nicholas Day, December 6th. This is often when the kids in those countries receive their gifts. Some of the countries that celebrate it are Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic and Hungary.

Posadas en Tequixquiac (4)
A Posada By Marrovi (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

In Mexico the celebrations begin on December 16th. Each night the children perform Posadas (which means inn). The kids parade in the night carrying candles and with someone acting as Mary and Joseph. They go to houses each night where Joseph asks for a room. Eventually at the chosen house they are told there is room and they are allowed in, followed with a party. In some parts of Mexico kids expect Santa Claus on Christmas Eve and in other parts they wait until January 6th for the Three Wisemen.

In the Philippines the celebration begins on December 16th as well. There it starts the nine days of pre-dawn church services which end on Christmas Day. The celebrating lasts until the first Sunday in January (Epiphany).

In Romania the celebrations start on December 20th with St. Ignatius Day. Traditionally this is the day the family kills the pig that will be for the Christmas meal. The real celebrating however begins Christmas Eve with the tradition of decorating the tree.

In Kazakhstan Christmas is not a national holiday, so it is often celebrated the Sunday before Christmas since people are off work that day.

Edinburgh Hogmanay Longship
A Viking longship is burnt during Edinburgh’s annual Hogmanay (New Year) celebrations.By Lee Kindness [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

Many countries celebrate December 24, 25th or January 6th or a combination of these days. The next interesting date to note is in Scotland. December 31st or Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve) is a bigger celebration than Christmas. The word Hogmanay comes from a type of oat cake which is given to the children on this day.

In Greece gifts are brought to the children on January 1st by Saint Basil. They however have celebrations for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

In Spain there are some gifts on Christmas day however the children write letters to the Kings on Boxing Day (December 26) asking for what they want. The Kings come on January 6th, the Epiphany.

The real difference in dates occur with the different calendars. Places that have Orthodox churches tend to celebrate Christmas on January 7th. This is in countries like Georgia, Ukraine, Serbia & Montenegro, Russia, Egypt, Ethiopia, and Macedonia. In Georgia however people get their gifts on December 31st (New Year’s Eve). The gifts are brought to the kids by Tolvis Papa or Grandfather Snow. In Macedonia the celebrations actually start January 5th called Kolede. The kids sing carols throughout the neighborhood and are given nuts, coins and fruit. When the singing is done everyone gathers around large bonfires.

With all the different dates and traditions, it makes the holiday season even more interesting. When do you celebrate Christmas? What is the most important part of the holiday for you?

Resources:

http://www.whychristmas.com/

http://gosouthamerica.about.com/od/venezuela/a/Christmas-In-Venezuela.htm

Crafty Moms ShareCarrie is a former high school math teacher with diversity training and helped advise many diversity clubs at the schools she taught. Now she is a stay-at-home mother of an almost five-year-old and very active with her church. She writes about her life with her daughter and the fun things they do at Crafty Moms Share. You can also find her on Pinterest and Google +.

This post is part of the Christmas in Different Lands series from Multicultural Kid Blogs.  Learn more about Christmas traditions and celebrations around the world through the other articles in this series.
Nov 052015
 

Indian Dress Tutorial | Alldonemonkey.com

Thank you to my blogging friend and fellow Multicultural Kid Blogs Board member Varya of Creative World of Varya for this wonderful article and tutorial on Indian dress!  As Diwali approaches, it is a wonderful time to learn about India with your kids!

When I was little, I was in love with Indian movies (what my mom thought was simple infatuation actually progressed into a much deeper love and appreciation for India and its ancient culture).

I loved dressing up. We had no access to Indian clothes and so I had to get creative.

Nowadays, it is super easy in many places to get your own Indian clothes, but if you want to dress up like an Indian princess without having to buy and wait for a long time, you can follow this simple tutorial and I am sure you will have pretty much everything at your disposal at home!

Before I proceed, I’d like to introduce several female costumes of India and share the original images so you have a good idea what they really look like

1. Sari

Girl in a sari

Image source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/A_girl_in_a_sari.jpg/282px-A_girl_in_a_sari.jpg

A Sari, saree, sadi, or shari is a South Asian female garment that consists of a drape varying from five to nine yards (4.57 metres to 8.23 metres) in length and two to four feet (60 cm to 1.20 m) in breadth that is typically wrapped around the waist, with one end draped over the shoulder, baring the midriff. (Quoted from Wikipedia – https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sari )

2. Garga Choli

Bride entering the hall for Indian Hindu wedding

Image source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8a/Bride_entering_the_hall_-_Indian_Hindu_Wedding.jpg/398px-Bride_entering_the_hall_-_Indian_Hindu_Wedding.jpg

Gagra choli or Ghagra choli, which is also known as Lehenga choli, is the traditional clothing of women in Rajasthan,Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Sindh, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Jammu & Hindi speaking Terai region of Nepal. It was also traditionally worn in the Punjab (with the kurti and salwar). It is a combination outfit of a Lehenga, tight Choli and a Dupatta. (Quoted from Wikipedia – https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghagra_choli )

3. Shalwar Kameez

Unstitched Salwar Kameez

Image source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/80/Unstitched_salwar_kameez_online_india.jpg

Shalwar kameez, also spelled salwar kameez or shalwar qameez, is a traditional outfit originating in South Asia and is a generic term used to describe different styles of dress. The shalwar kameez can be worn by both men and women, although styles differ by gender. The shalwar (pantaloons/drawers) and the kameez (body shirt) are two garments which have been combined to form the shalwar kameez outfit. (Quoted from Wikipedia – https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shalwar_kamiz )

Indian Dress Tutorial: Garga Choli

So today I will introduce to you a Garga Choli tutorial from “scratch” with items you probably have at home!

What is needed:

A plain dress/ a t-shirt and a colorful skirt
A belt or something that can serve as a belt (in case of the dress option)
A long scarf

For accessories:
Lots of bangles
Necklaces
Hair pins
Stickers (small flowers) or an eye liner (to make a bindi)

How to make it:

1. If your child is wearing a dress: put a belt on the waist.  Secure one corner of the scarf (“dupata”) at the back, and by placing it over chest, drop the other end of shoulder. You can use a pin or a broach. If your child is wearing a skirt and a T-shirt – tuck the end of the scarf into the skirt at the back and drape over the shoulder in front.

Indian Dress Tutorial | Alldonemonkey.com

Indian Dress Tutorial | Alldonemonkey.com

2. Put on lots of bracelets, add a headpiece (we used a necklace with an earring to resemble “tikka” ) and stick a flower sticker or draw a dot for a “bindi” between the eyebrows.

Indian Dress Tutorial | Alldonemonkey.com

Voilà, you can now dress up and give your child a little piece of Indian experience!

Creative World of VaryaVarya blogs at Creative World of Varya (formerly known as LittleArtists.Blog.Com). She is a mom to 3, an early development specialist, a baby massage and perinatal fitness instructor, and a breastfeeding consultant. Varya has been living in China for the past 12 years working and raising her multicultural family.
Diwali for Kids | Multicultural Kid Blogs
This post is part of the Diwali for Kids series on Multicultural Kid Blogs.  Visit our series main page for a full schedule of posts and to link up your own!
Oct 012015
 
 October 1, 2015  Book Reviews, California, Education, multiculturalism, raising world citizens Comments Off on Hispanic Heritage in California: Children’s Books

Hispanic Heritage in California: Children's Books | Alldonemonkey.com

Living in California means inheriting a rich Hispanic heritage, from the state’s historic missions to modern day poets and activists.  Below are wonderful children’s books we have discovered about Hispanics in California.  As can be expected, many of them focus on struggles for equality and making sense of migration.

This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission.

Children’s Books about Hispanic Heritage in California

It is fitting to begin with a book from California’s own Juan Felipe Herrera, recently named US Poet Laureate, the first Latino to achieve this honor.  Calling the Doves: El canto de las palomas and its sequel The Upside Down Boy: El niño de cabeza tell of Herrera’s childhood as the son of Mexican-American migrant farm workers in the fields of California.  In Calling the Doves, Herrera pays tribute to his parents, who taught him a love for the earth and the magic of language itself.

Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet In Spanish And English, which I just accidentally came across in our library, was actually the book that inspired me to create this book list.  It is a celebration of life working on California’s farms, through simple poems for each letter of the Spanish alphabet.  Farm workers are still stigmatized today, so I love that the author shows us what is beautiful about this way of life.  It is a wonderful way for all children to come to appreciate those that harvest our foods, and I can only imagine what an emotional boost this would be for migrant children to read.

In First Day In Grapes young readers learn about some of the difficulties of faced by children of migrant farm workers.  As his family moves up and down California harvesting fruits and vegetables, Chico is forever starting at a new school, with teachers and classmates who often snub him.  Third grade looks to be different, however, until a group of bullies confronts Chico and he learns to draw on his own inner strength and creativity to resolve the conflict.

Of course, no article about Hispanic heritage in California would be complete without mentioning César Chávez, the champion of migrant farm workers. Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez is a beautiful tribute to Chávez and won the Pura Belpré Illustrator Honor.  It tells of his early childhood on his family’s tranquil farm in Arizona and the drought that forced them and many others into a life in the farm labor camps in central California.  It also shows his progression from a child in the fields to a full-time worker himself and finally a leader for change.  It culminates in the historic march to Sacramento that resulted in the first labor contract for farm workers in the United States.  A similar book is the more recent A Picture Book of Cesar Chavez, which incorporates Chávez’s own words into the text and includes a timeline of his life.  For more on this topic, I also recommend Dolores Huerta: A Hero to Migrant Workers and Side by Side/Lado a Lado: The Story of Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez.

 

There has been a lot of buzz about Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’’s Fight for Desegregation, so I was glad to finally get a chance to read it for myself.  This award-winning book is a real treasure, based on the author’s own interviews with Sylvia Mendez, as well as court files and news accounts.  It tells of the not well known 1945 lawsuit against segregated schools in Orange County.  In 1947, the court ruled in favor of the Mexican-American families and soon after the Governor of California Earl Warren signed desegregation into law.  (Warren became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court and presided over the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education case, which desegregated schools throughout the US).

A more contemporary story of activism is ¡Si, Se Puede! / Yes, We Can!: Janitor Strike in L.A., based on the successful Los Angeles strike in 2000.  Told through the eyes of a worker’s young son, this award-winning book is a wonderful way of talking to children about current labor issues facing many Hispanic workers in California today.

From North to South: Del Norte al Sur tackles the difficult subject of family separation due to deportation.  José misses his mother, who was deported to Mexico two weeks earlier for not having the proper papers.  He is thrilled when he and his father are finally able to visit her at a shelter for women and children in Tijuana.  The author, who is also an elementary school teacher in Los Angeles, based the story on the experiences of many of his students and is donating a portion of his royalties to the refuge in Tijuana showcased in the book, where many women and children stay as they wait to be reunited with their families on the other side of the border.

I must admit that one of the reasons I love this book is that it is one of the few I found that does not focus on immigration or the plight of farm workers. Instead, Chato’s Kitchen introduces us to one of the coolest cats in East LA, who has his eye on a family of plump mice that have moved into his barrio.  This lively book and its sequel Chato and the Party Animals are a fun way to explore contemporary life in East Los Angeles.

Many children will be able to relate to this story of a young Mexican-American girl who just wants a little space to herself.  Based on the author’s own California childhood, it is a tale of the strength of family and a young girl’s need to stretch her wings.

Another wonderful book from this author-illustrator pair is My Diary from Here to There: Mi diario de aquí hasta allá, which relates a young girl’s journey with her family from Mexico to Los Angeles in search of better opportunities.  Through her fears and uncertainties she learns the power of her family’s love and of her own belief in herself.

When Jorgito’s family moves to San Francisco from El Salvador, he eases his home sickness through creating “movies in his pillow” each night to remember his native country. Based on the author’s own childhood memories, A Movie in My Pillow: Una película en me almohada (English and Spanish Edition) is a lovely book of poetry about imagination, home, and family.

Hispanic Heritage Month Series 2015 | Multicultural Kid BlogsThis post is part of the fourth annual Hispanic Heritage Month series and giveaway! Through the month (September 15 – October 15), you’ll find great resources to share Hispanic Heritage with kids, plus you can enter to win in our great giveaway and link up your own posts on Hispanic Heritage!

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway!

Giveaway begins Monday, September 14 and goes through October 15, 2015.

Enter below for a chance to win one of these amazing prize packages! Some prizes have shipping restrictions. In the event that a winner lives outside the designated shipping area, that prize will then become part of the following prize package. For more information, read our full giveaway rules.

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: Grand Prize

Grand Prize

Home Learning Series Level A Curriculum from Calico Spanish US Shipping Only

Puzzle and app from Mundo Lanugo US Shipping Only

Sheet of Mexico themed nail wraps from Jamberry US & Canada Shipping Only

Complete set of If You Were Me and Lived In… books (15 countries) from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Large Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse, bracelets, books, map) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

Growing Up Pedro & Mango, Abuela, and Me (in English or Spanish) from Candlewick Press US & Canada Shipping Only

The Giraffe That Ate the Moon and Caroline’s Color Dreams (bilingual books in English and Spanish) from Bab’l Books US, UK, & Europe Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Hola Hello CD from Mariana Iranzi US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

Kids’ T-shirt from Ellie Elote US Shipping Only

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: 1st Prize

First Prize

Perú, México and Portugal books from the If You Were Me and Lived In… series from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Smaller Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse, bracelets) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Hola Hello CD from Mariana Iranzi US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

3 picture books: Finding the Music/En pos de la música by Jennifer Torres Water Rolls, Water Rises/El agua rueda, el agua sube by Pat Mora The Upside Down Boy/ El niño de cabeza by Juan Felipe Herrera (in honor of his recently being named the Poet Laureate) from Lee and Low Books US Shipping Only

3 board books: 3 Board Books – Loteria, Zapata, Lucha Libre from Lil’ libros US Shipping Only

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage – Musical Craft and Coloring E-Book from Daria Marmaluk Hajioannou

Kid’s foreign language T-Shirt (available in Spanish, French, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Swahili, Hawaiian, Italian, in infant onesies, toddler and youth sizes tees and tanks; women’s tees and tanks SM-XL) from Mixed Up Clothing US Shipping Only

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: 2nd Prize

Second Prize

Perú, México and Portugal books from the If You Were Me and Lived In… series from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Smaller Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

2 picture books: Maya’s Blanket/La manta de Maya by Monica Brown Call Me Tree/Llámame Árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez from Lee & Low books US Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage – Musical Craft and Coloring E-Book from Daria Marmaluk Hajioannou

Bonus Prize!

Luchador piñata

Mexican luchador piñata from Las Piñatas de Laly EU Shipping Only

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sep 222015
 
 September 22, 2015  Book Reviews, multiculturalism, raising world citizens Comments Off on Argentina: Best Children’s Books

Argentina: Best Children's Books | Alldonemonkey.com This month our Global Learning Series is focusing on Argentina, so of course I raided our library for any and all books about this fascinating South American country!  Below is a collection of the best children’s books about Argentina that we found, a mix of legends, tall tales, and contemporary stories.  Enjoy! This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission.

Best Children’s Books about Argentina

Auki is a young boy anxious to join his father and the other men of his village in their annual hunt, but each year his father tells him he must wait. One day Auki decides to prove that he is ready by hunting for the puma alone. He not only comes face to face with the fearsome creature, he also stumbles upon a mysterious cave, whose walls are covered in painted hands. Forgetting his original quest, Auki sets out to discover the secret behind the hands, testing his own courage and wits in the process. Ghost Hands is a beautiful coming of age story inspired by the ancient Cave of Hands in Patagonia and the Tehuelche people who created it. The Magic Bean Tree: A Legend from Argentina is a Quechua legend from the pampas of Argentina.  When the rain stops falling one year, young Topec decides that the rain has just lost its way, so he sets out to bring it back.  In those days there was only one tree, a magic carob tree, and when he arrives there after a long journey, Topec is told by the tree that the Great Bird of the Underworld is blocking the sky with its giant wings, so that the gods cannot see that the pampas need rain.  Brave Topec leads his people in a daring plan to chase the Bird away and bring back the rain to the pampas.  Today in Argentina the carob tree is still considered to bring good luck. A Mapuche legend from the Patagonia region tells of Kalfulemu, whose curiosity lands him in trouble over and over but in the end leads to a better life for him and his people.  Kalfulemu sees the power that witches hold over the Mapuche and wants to discover the secret of the their power.  He tries to sneak up to a witch’s cave but becomes so frightened that he runs off without his shadow.  Without it, he is shunned by everyone and falls into despair and poverty.  Lonely, he strikes up a friendship with a tree (since trees could talk in those days), who comes up with a plan to get Kalfulemu’s shadow back – as long as his curiosity doesn’t get the best of him! El mapuche sin sombra (The Mapuche Without a Shadow) is a fun tale to share with your kids about the risks and rewards of following your curiosity. Argentina: Children's Books A really fun legend from the Mocobí people is Aletín y El Día Que El Cielo Se Vino Abajo (Aletin and the Day the Sky Fell), which tells of the early days of the world, when there were only a few people and plants and the sun sometimes forgot where it was going.  After a busy day of guiding the sun to its bed, Aletín wakens to find that the sky has fallen! He leads his people in an effort to hang the sky back up, only to see the sun come crashing down.  As the sun begins to burn the earth, changing people into never been seen animals, Aletin knows it is up to him to save his people.  A wonderfully told story of the creation of order in the world and the beginnings of the Mocobi people. The bilingual book Las Manchas del Sapo / How The Toad Got His Spots relates a folktale from Argentina about a toad who loved to dance and sing.  When Luisito finds out that the birds are having a dance in the sky, he simply has to find a way to attend.  He hitches a ride in a guitar case, but his presence doesn’t go unnoticed.  When the birds discover their uninvited guest, they decide to teach him a lesson.  A fun animal story to share with kids. Teach children about the history of Argentina’s independence from Spain by learning about San Martin, considered the liberator of Argentina, Peru, and Chile. In Conoce a Jose de San Martin / Get to know Jose de San Martin we see the Great Liberator as an old man, playing with his beloved granddaughter. The story itself only hints at his role in history, instead showing us San Martin as his family might have seen him, though a more detailed biography as well as a glossary are included at the back of the book. Part of a series of children’s biographies on important figures from Latin American history, such as Picasso, Bolívar, and Neruda. One of the most remarkable stories is Jemmy Button, based on the true story of one of four young natives taken from Tierra del Fuego to England in 1830 as part of an imperialist experiment in “forced civilization.”  Jemmy Button’s English name comes from the mother-of-pearl button that his family was given as payment for him.  The book captures well what this incredible journey must have been like for Jemmy, through the long overseas journey and adapting to life in a strange new land.  While the book hints that Jemmy spent years in England, it was actually about 15 months, after which he and his two surviving companions were returned home.  (One had died of smallpox soon after reaching England).  As a children’s book, this doesn’t dive into all the complexity of the story and what life after his return was like for Jemmy, but it is a wonderful tool to start children thinking about such episodes in history. Get a look at life on a traditional ranch in the Argentine pampas as we follow a young girl (the author as a child) as she leaves Buenos Aires to spend the summer with her grandparents in the countryside. Young María Cristina learns to ride horses, use a lasso like the gauchos (cowboys), and steal an egg from the nest of a ñandú (South American ostrich). On the Pampas is a wonderful way to teach children about what life was like in the pampas for many people during the early part of the century. In On the Pampas (above) Maria Cristina Brusca mentions how much as a child she loved to listen to the gauchos tell tall tales around the campfire. One such tale she undoubtedly heard was this version of the Hispanic folktale about a poor blacksmith who inadvertently sells his soul to the devil for 20 years of youth and a bag of gold. But when the Devil comes to collect years later, he is the one who is in for a surprise! Find out how this wily old man manages to outwit the Devil and his companions in The Blacksmith and the Devils. Tina en el Aconcagua : El centinela de piedra (The Stone Sentry) is one of the few books I found set in contemporary Argentina. It is part of a series of books about Tina, a young world adventurer who loves to mountain climb! She has climbed mountains like Everest and Kilimanjaro, so when she goes to South America of course she wants to climb its highest peak as well.  As a result, Tina travels with her new friend Lucho to Argentina’s Aconcagua.  Before reaching the summit, the kids visit with local animals, hear an Incan legend, and learn about an ancient mummy discovered nearby.  The engaging story and illustrations make this a fun way for kids to learn about Argentina.   Hispanic Heritage Month Series 2015 | Multicultural Kid BlogsThis post is part of the fourth annual Hispanic Heritage Month series and giveaway! Through the month (September 15 – October 15), you’ll find great resources to share Hispanic Heritage with kids, plus you can enter to win in our great giveaway and link up your own posts on Hispanic Heritage!  This post is also part of the Global Learning Series focusing on Argentina, so be sure to stop by for great resources to teach kids about Argentina!

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway!

Giveaway begins Monday, September 14 and goes through October 15, 2015.

Enter below for a chance to win one of these amazing prize packages! Some prizes have shipping restrictions. In the event that a winner lives outside the designated shipping area, that prize will then become part of the following prize package. For more information, read our full giveaway rules.

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: Grand Prize

Grand Prize

Home Learning Series Level A Curriculum from Calico Spanish US Shipping Only

Puzzle and app from Mundo Lanugo US Shipping Only

Sheet of Mexico themed nail wraps from Jamberry US & Canada Shipping Only

Complete set of If You Were Me and Lived In… books (15 countries) from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Large Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse, bracelets, books, map) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

Growing Up Pedro & Mango, Abuela, and Me (in English or Spanish) from Candlewick Press US & Canada Shipping Only

The Giraffe That Ate the Moon and Caroline’s Color Dreams (bilingual books in English and Spanish) from Bab’l Books US, UK, & Europe Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Hola Hello CD from Mariana Iranzi US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

Kids’ T-shirt from Ellie Elote US Shipping Only

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: 1st Prize

First Prize

Perú, México and Portugal books from the If You Were Me and Lived In… series from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Smaller Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse, bracelets) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Hola Hello CD from Mariana Iranzi US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

3 picture books: Finding the Music/En pos de la música by Jennifer Torres Water Rolls, Water Rises/El agua rueda, el agua sube by Pat Mora The Upside Down Boy/ El niño de cabeza by Juan Felipe Herrera (in honor of his recently being named the Poet Laureate) from Lee and Low Books US Shipping Only

3 board books: 3 Board Books – Loteria, Zapata, Lucha Libre from Lil’ libros US Shipping Only

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage – Musical Craft and Coloring E-Book from Daria Marmaluk Hajioannou

Kid’s foreign language T-Shirt (available in Spanish, French, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Swahili, Hawaiian, Italian, in infant onesies, toddler and youth sizes tees and tanks; women’s tees and tanks SM-XL) from Mixed Up Clothing US Shipping Only

Hispanic Heritage Month Giveaway: 2nd Prize

Second Prize

Perú, México and Portugal books from the If You Were Me and Lived In… series from Carole P. Roman US Shipping Only

Smaller Latin American prize basket (scarves, purse) from Spanish Playground US Shipping Only

2 picture books: Maya’s Blanket/La manta de Maya by Monica Brown Call Me Tree/Llámame Árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez from Lee & Low books US Shipping Only

Bienvenidas las raras (bilingual book in English and Spanish) from Delia Berlin

Los Animales CD from Mister G US Shipping Only

Bananagrams game in Spanish from Bananagrams US Shipping Only

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage – Musical Craft and Coloring E-Book from Daria Marmaluk Hajioannou

Bonus Prize!

Luchador piñata

Mexican luchador piñata from Las Piñatas de Laly EU Shipping Only

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sep 072015
 

Latino Bedtime Stories | Alldonemonkey.com

In anticipation of Hispanic Heritage Month, here are some favorite Latino bedtime stories!  Some are in Spanish, others are bilingual, others are mostly in English with Spanish phrases sprinkled in; some emphasize cultural themes or traditions.

What they have in common is passing on heritage – whether through language or culture – through the snuggly intimacy of bedtime stories.  Enjoy!

Disclosure: I received complimentary copies of books from Bab’l Books for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own.  This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission.

Latino Bedtime Stories

Kitchen Dance is a new favorite of mine!  Two children are tucked into their beds when they hear strange noises coming from the kitchen.  They sneak our of bed and find … their parents, dancing as they put away the dishes!  Their father croons a Spanish song into a wooden spoon as he spins their mother around the kitchen.  Soon the children are discovered and included in the kitchen dance before being gently returned to bed.  This sweet story about a family’s love is a wonderful way to send your children off to dreamland.

George was the shortest giraffe in his herd. He dreams of being so tall that he could eat the moon. But when one night his dream comes true, he gets a big surprise! The Giraffe That Ate the Moon (La Jirafa Que Se Comió la Luna) is an adorable bilingual story about learning to be happy as you are and discovering what is really important.  It and the other bilingual books from Bab’l Books were created through a unique translation process: crowd sourcing!  Read more about it in this interview on Trilingual Mama and enter below for a chance to win this book and Don’t Wake the Baby! (No Despiertes a la Bebé!)

A truly beautiful book is Nochecita from the wonderful Yuyi Morales (also available in English as Little Night).  Nochecita is a story all parents and children can relate to, of a child playing hide and seek instead of coming when her mothers calls her.  But this is no ordinary child, it is Night itself, thus the delightful twist at the end as we discover that Nochecita is not getting ready for bed – as most children do when it grows dark – but going out to play in the night sky with her ball, the moon.  Children will enjoy the playful antics of Nochecita and Mother Sky’s loving responses, as well as seeing if they can guess where Nochecita is hiding this time.  The enchanting, magical illustrations complement the story beautifully, as Nochecita’s bath is made of stars, her dress of clouds, and her hair pinned up with the sparkling trio of Venus, Mercury, and Jupiter.

I got turned onto Texas author Pat Mora thanks to my friend Becky at Kid World Citizen, and I’m so glad!  While Mora has written many wonderful books, Little Monkey and I are currently loving her My Family/Mi Familia series, which follow the adventures and daily rhythms of one bilingual family.  In Sweet Dreams/Dulces Sueños, Grandma comes to tuck the children into bed, telling them about all the animals that are also lying down to sleep. A wonderfully gentle way to coax your little ones to sleep as well.

Can’t sleep? Why not count sheep – in English and Spanish? Counting Ovejas is a really cute story about a boy who does just that, though the sheep don’t do exactly as they are told! This bilingual book is a fun way to teach numbers and colors in Spanish.

Take a fantastical journey through a dream world as the night spins tales to a child at bedtime. The imagination has no limits as the child travels from one magical scene to another before finally drifting off to sleep. Cuento de Noche (Spanish Edition) is a beautiful bedtime book from Spanish author Roberto Aliaga that highlights the wonder of the imagination.

A long-time favorite in our house is Arrorró, mi niño: Latino Lullabies and Gentle Games.  Described as a “Latina Mother Goose,” this is amazing collection of the best known lullabies and gentle games for young children in Spanish.  If, like me, you did not grow up with them, you will appreciate the wonderful English translations and clear instructions, in addition to the piano music at the back for learning the melodies!

In a similar vein, ¡Pío Peep!: Traditional Spanish Nursery Rhymes is an incredible collection of traditional Spanish nursery rhymes, including favorites like De colores and Los elefantes.  It is a comprehensive set of almost any traditional rhyme from Latin America, all wonderful to share with your kids at bedtime!

This post has been shared at the wonderful Kid Lit Blog Hop.

Bilingual Books Giveaway!

Enter below for a chance to win a pair of bilingual books from Bab’l Books!  You could win The Giraffe that Ate the Moon (La Jirafa Que Se Comió la Luna) or Don’t Wake the Baby! (No Despiertes a la Bebé!)These wonderful Spanish/English children’s books are ideal for children ages 2-6.  Giveaway goes through September 15, 2015. US, UK, and Europe shipping only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Aug 212015
 
 August 21, 2015  Book Reviews, Iran, multiculturalism, raising world citizens Comments Off on Folktales from Iran

Folktales from Iran | Alldonemonkey.com

Folktales are a great way for kids to learn about another culture. They teach about traditional values and ways of life and often include fantastical characters and incredible adventures that highlight life lessons and let kids dream of far-off lands long ago. Below are some of our favorite folktales from Iran.

This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission.

The Legend of the Persian Carpet is a beautiful tale from Tomie dePaola about King Balash, a good-hearted ruler who wants to share with his people the beauty of a very special diamond. But when the diamond is stolen, the king is so heart-broken he can no longer rule, and it is up to a young boy to put into motion a clever plan to bring the diamond’s splendor back to the palace and save the kingdom. This is a sweet story of a creative solution to a difficult problem, and it also lends itself very well to crafts to learn more about the world-famous Persian carpets.

Pea Boy and Other Stories from Iran is a collection of folk tales, including a silly cockroach who learns to be responsible and a humble girl who defeats a monster through her devotion to a childhood love.  One of my favorites is the story of Kayvan the Brave, a “wise fool” who reminded me quite a bit of the German “Brave Little Tailor.”  When Kayvan brags of killing two lions (actually two mice) in a single blow, people are so impressed – and Kayvan manages to stumble into doing such great deeds – that in the end he becomes the Commander-in-Chief of the Shah’s armies!

In a far-off kingdom, a young musician has just one chance to fulfill his dream of playing before the king.  But can he overcome the obstacles created by a jealous rival is determined to stop him?  Inspired by a Persian tale, The Green Musician is a story of patience and determination, brought to life in gorgeous illustrations.

Discover the beauty of a thousand year old tale in The Knight, the Princess, and the Magic Rock.  Found in the legendary Persian “Book of Kings” (Shahnameh), it contains all the elements of a classic folktale – star-crossed lovers, a brave knight, a beautiful princess, magical potions, and heroic deeds.

In Forty Fortunes: A Tale of Iran Ahmed, a simple laborer, is persuaded by his wife to become a fortune teller in order to earn more money.  When, by sheer luck, he finds the lost ring of a rich woman, he is called before the King to find the royal treasure and the forty thieves who have stolen it.  Unfortunately, Ahmed has no talent for divining and thus no way of recovering the treasure.  Can he manage to find a way out of his predicament, or will he be throw into jail?  A beautifully done version of a popular folktale.

The Stone: A Persian Legend of the Magi is a great book to teach children about the connections between religions, in this case Zoroastrianism and Christianity. The Stone is the Persian legend – as told to Marco Polo – of the three Magi who brought gifts to Jesus and the mysterious gift they received in return. (Find more resources to teach kids about Zoroastrianism).

The King and the Three Thieves: A Persian Tale is an intriguing tale of a good king who wants to know the common people.  He dresses as a beggar one night and befriends three strangers – who turn out to be thieves intent on robbing the king!  Can the king stop the plot, and how will the thieves react when they discover his true identity?  A lesson in wisdom and learning to keep your word, even if you are a king.

Global Learning for Kids | Multicultural Kid Blogs

This post is part of the Global Learning series, where each month we focus on a different country. This month we are learning about Iran, so be sure to check out the main page for more great ideas for sharing about Iran with kids!

Also, don’t miss our blog series and giveaway for Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Month, going through the end of August!

Aug 132015
 

Zoroastrianism for Kids | Alldonemonkey.com

This month for the Global Learning for Kids series from Multicultural Kid Blogs we are focusing on Iran, a country very dear to my heart!  Last year for the World Cup for Kids project, we were on Team Iran, publishing several posts on this beautiful country, including children’s books about Iran, Persian-inspired summer treats, and a lesson in Iranian geology using play dough!

So this year I thought we’d take a different perspective by focusing on Iran’s contribution to the world’s spiritual heritage; specifically I was curious to learn more about Zoroastrianism, one of the world’s oldest monotheistic religions.

Zoroastrianism for Kids | Alldonemonkey.com

Zarathustra, known to the Greeks as Zoroaster. Source: http://omnionica.wikispaces.com/Zoroaster

The principal religion on ancient Persia (modern-day Iran), it was founded in more than 3000 years ago by the Prophet Zarathustra, known to the Greeks as Zoroaster.  (Estimates of the dates vary greatly).  Zoroastrianism emphasizes the battle between good and evil in the world.  Each individual is believed to have the free will to choose between these two forces.  Contrary to popular belief, Zoroastrians do not worship fire; rather, it is a sacred symbol of purification.

Zoroastrianism for Kids | Alldonemonkey.com

Central fire at Zoroastrian shrine near Baku
Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/apothecary/5921216114/

Though their numbers are relatively small today, Zoroastrian communities are thriving, and their influence on world history is significant.  Several of the great empire builders of Persia were Zoroastrians, and it is believed that the Magi from the Christian nativity were Zoroastrians as well.  Many scholars argue that Zoroastrianism had a substantial influence on the development of later monotheistic religions, namely Judaism and Christianity.

Zoroastrianism for Kids | Alldonemonkey.com

Faravahar, symbol of Zoroastrianism. Source: Walter S. Arnold, http://stonecarver.com/

Below are some of my favorite resources on Zoroastrianism for kids, including a video, websites, books, and even a comic!

This post contains affiliate links.  If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission.

Zoroastrianism for Kids

This video is one of the only ones on Zoroastrianism I found aimed at young kids.  It is a cute, animated, and short, covering all the basics of the religion.

For a great, hands-on activity, try this simple sacred fire jar craft from Highhill Education (a really great homeschool blog with very creative activities for kids!)

The Stone: A Persian Legend of the Magi would be a particularly interesting choice for those coming from a Christian background.  It is based on tales told to Marco Polo of the Persian legend of the Magi, the three wise men who paid homage to Jesus soon after His birth.  Told from the perspective of the Magi, it focuses on their journey to see Jesus and the mysterious gift they receive in return.

Zoroastrian Kids Korner is a fun site aimed at kids.  It includes stories, crafts, and games, though the latter require previous knowledge of the religion in order to play.  The author of the site has also published a book of prayers for children, My Little Book of Zoroastrian Prayers: With Some Fun Activities.  Aimed at children 9-12, it includes simple prayers from the Avesta, as well as activities and basic concepts.

Another site for kids is Zoroastrian Kids Place.  It includes facts, stories, prayers, and a look at the animals of the Avesta!

A good reference book for older children is Zoroastrianism (World Religions (Facts on File)). It is part of a series of books for kids on world religions.

And finally, I was so happy to discover a comic about the life of Zoroaster! Zarathushtra is based on the traditional account of the Prophet’s life, told in a way that children will find very engaging.

 

Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Month | Multicultural Kid Blogs
This post is part of the Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Blog Series and Giveaway. Please visit our landing page for the full schedule and to link up any of your posts on sharing Middle Eastern and North African heritage with kids. And don’t forget to enter our giveaway below!

Giveaway

Our giveaway runs through the month of August, so enter below for a chance to win! Some prizes have shipping restrictions. If the winner is outside of the shipping area of one of the prizes, that prize will then be included in the next prize package. (See our full giveaway rules).

Grand Prize

Middle Eastern and Northern African Heritage Month Giveaway | Multicultural Kid Blogs

From Tuttle Publishing, The Complete Middle East Cookbook: Traditional recipes with clear instructions for the modern cook

From Medina Publishing, Discovering Islamic Art: A generously illustrated child’s guide to Islamic art, complete with activity sheets

From A Crafty Arab, Arabic Animal Alphabet Poster: Beautiful artwork with unique designs to teach Arabic letters

From Wisdom Tales Press, The Olive Tree (US shipping only): A beautiful tale of friendship set in Lebanon

1st Prize

Middle Eastern and Northern African Heritage Month Giveaway | Multicultural Kid Blogs

From Tuttle Publishing, An Edible Mosaic: A cookbook of favorite Middle Eastern recipes

From Wisdom Tales Press, The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria (US shipping only): Fascinating biography of Emir Abdel Kader, heroic 19th century leader and a pioneer in interfaith dialogue

From Wisdom Tales Press, The Green Musician (US shipping only): A magical story of patience and determination, adapted from the original Persian tale

From GeoToys, Geo Puzzle Africa and the Middle East (US contiguous states shipping only): Jumbo sized puzzle for ages 4 and up

2nd Prize

Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Month Series and Giveaway | Multicultural Kid Blogs

From Chicago Review Press, Kid’s Guide to Arab American History (US shipping only): Award-winning guide to the diversity of Arab American experience, with fun extension activities and biographies of famous Arab Americans

From Wisdom Tales Press, The Knight, the Princess & the Magic Rock (US shipping only): A retelling of a legendary Persian tale of heroism and love.

From Salaam Designs, 4 piece Holiday Cookie Cutter set (US shipping only): boxed set: Boxed set perfect for Ramadan and Eid includes Crescent, Star, Ramadan lantern (Fanoos), & Mosque.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Jun 212015
 
 June 21, 2015  Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop, family, multiculturalism Comments Off on Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop #28: Fathers in Art

Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop #28: Fathers in Art | Alldonemonkey.com

Welcome to the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop!

The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place where bloggers can share multicultural activities, crafts, recipes, and musings for our creative kids. We can’t wait to see what you share this time!

Created by Frances of Discovering the World through My Son’s Eyes, the blog hop has now found a new home at Multicultural Kid Blogs.

This month our co-hosts are:

Crafty Moms Share on Multicultural Kid Blogs
La Cité des Vents
Crafty Moms Share
Castle View Academy
The Art Curator for Kids
Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes
All Done Monkey
Russian Step by Step for Children
Los Gringos Locos
Crazy Little Family Adventure
Life with My Koreans

Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place for you to share your creative kids culture posts. It’s very easy, and simple to participate!
Just follow these simple guidelines:

  • Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook. Please let us know you’re following us, and we will be sure to follow you back.
  • Link up any creative kids culture posts, such as language, culture, books, travel, food, crafts, playdates, activities, heritage, and holidays, etc. Please, link directly to your specific post, and no giveaways, shops, stores, etc.
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
  • Please grab the button code above and put it on your blog or the post you’re linking up. You can also add a text link back to this hop on your blog post. Note: By sharing your link up on this blog hop you are giving us permission to feature your blog post with pictures, and to pin your link up in our Creative Kids Culture Feature board on Pinterest.
  • Don’t be a stranger, and share some comment love! Visit the other links, and comment. Everyone loves comments!
  • The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop will go live on the 3rd Sunday of the month. It will run for three weeks. The following blog hop we will feature a previous link up post, and if you’re featured, don’t forget to grab the button below:
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop

Here’s my favorite from last time:

25 Views of Fathers in Art: The Art Curator for Kids

In honor of Father’s Day, I’m so pleased to feature this wonderful look at Fathers in Art from The Art Curator for Kids.  Treat yourself with taking a look at these amazing works of art!
Thank you for linking-up, and we can’t wait to see what you’ve been up to!

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial