Oct 252018
 
 October 25, 2018  Book Reviews, parenting  Add comments

A major focus at schools today is bullying, and for good reason. We often talk about how to help kids deal with being bullied, but there is another aspect that needs to be taken into account: what to do when they see someone else being bullied. Here are tips to teach kids to stop bullying by being allies to bullied students, to help break the cycle.

Keep in mind, these actions are not meant to replace adult involvement but rather reinforce it, as often a child is less likely to be picked on if they are with friends. Children should always tell a teacher or administrator if they see bullying. They can also be an ally, a powerful step towards preventing bullying from occurring or helping diffuse a bullying situation. For more on how to stop bullying visit this comprehensive website.

Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of I Am Gandhi for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Stop Bullying: Teach Kids to Be Allies | Alldonemonkey.com

Stop Bullying: Teach Kids to Be Allies

1. Distract the Bully

What should children do if they see another child being bullied? They can step in and stop the bullying – not by arguing with the bully or yelling at them to stop, but simply by distracting them. I was so impressed at my son’s recent karate class when the instructors taught the students to give the bully a compliment to distract them. This allows them to then take the bullied student by the hand and walk somewhere else. Distract with a compliment rather than getting into a combative situation. Brilliant!

2. Stop It Before It Starts

Most kids know who is being bullied at their school and when it usually happens. Teach them to keep an eye out for bullied students and try to head off the bullying before it begins. If they see a bully heading over to another student, they can get to that student first and invite them to join in a game on the playground, for example.

3. Practice Inclusion

Take this a step further by getting to know the bullied student and forming a friendship. When I was in elementary school, a friend of mine was constantly teased because of her looks and awkward behavior. Yet consistently if I was with her the other students tended to leave her alone – she was no longer an easy target. Having true friendships can also help stop bullying by helping build up the bullied student’s confidence.

4. Create a Respectful Environment 

Students can also stop bullying by helping create an environment where everyone feels respected and safe. If children laugh along with the bully or stay silent, bullies feel encouraged to continue their behavior. Other students can help change a toxic environment by making it clear that bullying is unacceptable and making sure all students feel included. They can work together to think of ways to foster this type of environment – by showing kindness to others, or putting on a school program.

One of the greatest historical examples of a person being an ally to the persecuted was Gandhi. Not only did he stand up for justice when his own people were oppressed, he did the same for others, including the Untouchables, the lowest of the low at the time in India. Children can read Gandhi’s amazing life story in I am Gandhi, part of the people Ordinary People Change the World series. I love getting to use this book to teach my children about Gandhi and how it sparked a conversation between my boys about what it means to “gently shake the world” as Gandhi did.

One of the remarkable aspects of this book, as with all of the books in this series, is that it puts historical events and trends into terms that children can understand without watering them down, highlighting the lessons that they can have in the children’s own lives. For example, I am Gandhi teaches them about Gandhi’s concept of satyagraha, ultimately explaining it as a “truth force” – which, as one character points out, sounds like a superhero team!

Our copy of this inspiring, extremely readable biography came in the mail one day just before we meet with our homeschooling group, so my son took it with him. Several of the other mothers noticed his book and told me how much their children love this book series. I highly recommend it as a great source of inspiration for children to become part of the “truth force,” to bring about change and fight for a world where everyone feels valued.

I Am Justice Blog Tour

WEEK ONE: I am Gandhi

October 22 – A Buckeye Teacher – Creative Instagram Picture + Review

October 23 – Little Homeschool on the Prairie – Fun Facts

October 24 – Happily Ever Elephants – Review + Learning Activity

October 25 – All Done Monkey – Learning Activity

WEEK TWO: I am Martin Luther King Jr.

October 29 – Reading by ovenlight – Creative Instagram Picture + Review

October 30 – 4th Grade Unicorns – Creative Instagram Picture + Review

October 31 – What’s a Kid to Read – Creative Instagram Picture + Review

November 1 – Bookoholicmom – Fun Facts

WEEK THREE: I am Rosa Parks

November 5 – Simple at Home – Learning Activity

November 6 – Within the Pages – Fun Facts

November 7 – Coquette Maman – Fun Facts

November 8 – Lovely Little Reads – Fun Facts

WEEK FOUR: I am Sonia Sotomayor

November 12 – My Little Poppies – Creative Instagram Picture

November 13 – Gravity Bread – Review + Language and Learning Tips

November 14 – Biracial Bookworms – Review + Creative Instagram Picture

November 15 – Girls Read the World – Review + Creative Instagram Picture

November 16 – This Picture Book Life – Creative Instagram Picture + Quotes from the Justice

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