Jul 192018
 

As a Spanish (non-native) speaker, I have mostly blogged about my experiences teaching Spanish to my children. Last year, however, we decided to try something new and add French to our repertoire. I have always wanted to learn myself, and it has been a very different experience learning a language alongside my children instead of teaching them from years of experience! Here are our favorite resources to learn French no matter what your age!

And don’t miss out on receiving a FREE code for a French learning app for kids! Details at the end of the post.

Learn French as a Family: Favorite Resources | Alldonemonkey.com

Disclosure: I receive complimentary copies of many of the products below for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

Learn French as a Family: Favorite Resources

I am so excited to learn French with my kids! It is a language I have always been fascinated with, but I have had only limited exposure over the years. I have no formal training in French (I studied Spanish and a little Portuguese in school), so there were many surprises for me. (Did you know that when you say eighty in French you are literally saying “four twenties”? And why do they pronounce so few of the letters in their words??)

If you want to learn French along with your kids, don’t be intimidated by your lack of knowledge. In fact, there are many benefits to learning a language alongside your children. If nothing else, they will love seeing that Mom and Dad can make mistakes, too!

Books

Beep Beep In Paris is a very sweet picture book about a little car who is off having adventures in Paris. It is a wonderful way not only to practice French but also to learn about famous landmarks of Paris. As we are just learning French, it is very helpful to read a bilingual book like this, so we can check our understanding without missing the flow of the story. Be sure to enjoy with a warm cup of chocolat! 

At Home with Betty and Cat sample

At Home with Betty & Cat is part of a series of unusual bilingual books. Most bilingual books have the complete text in one language alongside the complete text in a second language. Yet the concept of these clever books is based on how children often play with language, frequently switching back and forth between languages (“code switching”). In the Betty & Cat stories, the dog in the story speaks one language, while the cat speaks another. This language distinction is just one of the differences between the pair!

This series is available in a variety of combinations (we chose Spanish and French!) The ideal reader is one that already has a basic understanding of the target language, though this need not be perfect. Especially great for kids that have started at an immersion school, whose grandparents speak another language, or whose families are bilingual.

Apps & YouTube

Gus on the Go French

Gus on the Go is a super fun, play based app that will have your children learning and playing with French words right from the beginning! Your child does not need any prior knowledge of French to get started, as vocabulary is gradually taught with fun visuals and games. But as they work their way through the levels, they gain nearly 90 new words in French!

My kids took to this app right away. They thought the games were really fun, and they loved earning rewards – always a great motivation!

Now you can try out this app, too, just by being one of the first to comment on this post! (See details at the end).

Another great language learning app is Duolingo. In fact, it keeps popping up in chat groups as an app that works well for adults as well as older children. It is easy to use and very engaging. I love that it utilizes several different kinds of questions to learn the same vocabulary – matching, translating to/from French, writing what you hear, and so on. My only problem with it is that it doesn’t actually explain the rules of the language. For an analytical person like me, it’s easier to be told the grammar rule rather than just having to guess it from the examples.

Which is why I also love Learning French with Alexa on YouTube. Alexa has a very funny personality, with well organized lessons. So you can systematically go through them, or jump right into one that grabs your interest (or that you didn’t quite understand from other sources). Also, I love getting more exposure to proper pronunciation, as this is a real challenge for me coming from Spanish.

Learning Aids

Linguacious™ Around the Home French Flashcard Game is an innovative, award winning tool that your kids will love! If you have decided to learn French along with your child, you may worry that you aren’t able to teach them the proper pronunciation. Linguacious™ Around the Home French Flashcard Game is a clever solution to this common problem. These sturdy flashcards come not only with engaging photos and vocabulary but audio, too!

All you have to do is scan the QR code on each flashcard to hear a native speaker pronounce the word. (Btw this is a great way to engage tech-loving kids! Mine love scanning the code themselves). And in the time since I reviewed their Around the Spanish Flashcard Game (read my full review), Linguacious has come out with their own app to scan the QR codes. It works so much more quickly, making learning new vocabulary even easier than before!

Now, if you are like me and want to feel like you’re taking a class (without actually having to take a class), I recommend Living Language French, Essential Edition: Beginner course. It comes with a coursebook, 3 audio CDs, and free online tools. Last summer I spent time reading the book and doing the exercises, but what I really loved was listening to the CDs. It was so easy to put them on when we were running errands, and, though it is aimed at adults, it was great to expose the kids to more French!

Pinterest Boards

There are so many wonderful language learning ideas out there. Find even more on these Pinterest boards – I’m always finding something new!

Multicultural Kid Blogs: Teaching French

The Piri-Piri Lexicon: French Resources

Biracial Bookworms: Learning French

For even more resources and activities to learn French, check out this incredible collection from my friend at Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes!

Giveaway

Now for the giveaway! You can try out Gus on the Go French app simply by being one of the first ten people to comment on this post! Just let me know why you’d love to learn French with your kids.

Please note that the codes are for Android devices, but Gus on the Go has generously offered to make iOS codes available as well – just make a note if you need one of those instead!

All participants must have a valid email address. Giveaway open through Friday, July 27, 2018, at midnight PT. Winners will be the first ten verified people to comment on this post.

May 212018
 
 May 21, 2018  bilingualism, Spanish Comments Off on Homeschooling Spanish for Multiple Children

Are you homeschooling Spanish for multiple children? It can be a real challenge to meet the needs of all of your children at their different stages of learning.

Visit us on Spanish Playground today to find out what works for us! I’m sharing tips for how you can balance group activities with individual attention and an immersive environment so you can meet the needs of all your children and their learning needs:

Homeschooling Spanish for Multiple Children

Mar 162018
 
 March 16, 2018  bilingualism, Spanish 2 Responses »

Are you teaching your child to speak Spanish? Here are some ideas on how to help him with his pronunciation in Spanish and some general thoughts about when and how to do so. Share your own tips in the comments, and don’t miss an exclusive discount code for a fun new product to help with Spanish language learning!

Disclosure: I received a complimentary set of flashcards from Linguacious for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you. 

Pronunciation in Spanish: Tips for Helping Your Child

One challenge of teaching your child to speak Spanish is helping her to pronounce the words correctly. Especially if you start when your child is older, but even if you start when they are young but they are immersed in an English-speaking culture, pronunciation in Spanish will inevitably present some difficulties. Yet there are some simple ways you can help!

But first, some general cautions:

Multilingual Parenting has an excellent article on whether to correct your bilingual child’s language. As a parent and educator, our relationship with our child is much different than that of a teacher and student in a traditional classroom. She cautions strongly against constantly correcting your child, instead focusing on encouraging them when they use language correctly. As she often reiterates on her blog, as a parent you also must focus on your relationship with your child as well as the child’s long-term enthusiasm for learning the language.

So be careful about when and whether to correct your child’s pronunciation in Spanish. As a general rule, the more self-conscious they feel when they speak, the less enjoyable it will be for them and the less they will want to continue.

If you are a homeschooler, you may be at a slight advantage because your child is used to seeing you as a teacher who will be providing instruction in Spanish as in other subjects such as math and history. As a result, when you are in “class mode,” they may be more open to having direct help with pronunciation.

And now, for some fun ideas to help with your child’s pronunciation in Spanish – sometimes without them even realizing it!

1. Rhymes

Rhymes are a great way to help with a child’s pronunciation in Spanish, as they must attend to the sounds of the words and listen carefully for similar sounds. Here are some printable rhyming words, including links to traditional rhymes in Spanish.

2. Music

Using music to teach Spanish works on so many levels – it’s fun, it teaches culture, and – it’s great for pronunciation! Music often contains repetition of important words and phrases, and children often “get” pronunciation better when it is set to music. Again, it is a way of encouraging them to really listen to the sounds in words. Spanish Playground also has some wonderful hand-clapping games that work to teach pronunciation in a similar way. You can also find cute musical videos to help teach pronunciation.

3. Focus on Syllables

Spanish letters have much more uniform sounds than in English, which can be really helpful when teaching pronunciation in Spanish! When children really understand how Spanish syllables are pronounced, it makes it easy for them to confront long and more complex vocabulary later on. So try breaking the language down into syllables and help teach pronunciation using tools like this printable syllable wheel. Clapping activities can help them learn where to put the correct stress.

4. Mouth Exercises

Did you know that you can actually do simple mouth exercises with your child to help them with their pronunciation? Here is an article by a speech language pathologist on mouth exercises that help with clear speech. It includes a special note on the Italian “r,” which is similar to the Spanish “r.”

5. About those “R’s”

If there is any aspect of pronunciation in Spanish that gives a child trouble, it is sure to be that rolled “r”! (The flipped “r” is a bit tricky as well but easier to teach and correct). Here is a collection of ideas from parents and educators on how to help kids to roll their “r’s” – although the main message is to not worry about it too much, as even native speakers have trouble with this when they’re young!

6. Exposure to Native Speakers

For me, one of the most important things you can do to help your child with his pronunciation in Spanish is to expose him as much as possible to the speech of native speakers. The more he hears the language, the more his ear will become accustomed to it and the more natural the correct pronunciation will sound to him. And while it may take him a while to be able to replicate the sounds himself, this is a small challenge compared to those children who simply don’t know how words should be pronounced or who cannot remember because of lack of exposure.

If you are not a native speaker yourself or even if you don’t speak Spanish, there are still many ways you can make sure your child is exposed to the speech of native speakers. And even if you are a native speaker, it can be very helpful for your child to listen to other native speakers as well, so they can hear other accents and listen to vocabulary and speech patterns you perhaps don’t use as much.

Obviously, if you have friends or relatives who are native speakers, take advantage of this wonderful opportunity for interaction. If you don’t have access to native speakers your child can meet face to face, you can still listen to Spanish language radio, Spanish music, and Spanish language media.

And I’m also excited to introduce you to a brand-new way to reinforce correct pronunciation in Spanish: through these wonderful new flash cards from Linguacious!

You may think, what do flash cards have to do with pronunciation?

These well-made flash cards (available in dozens of other languages as well) were developed by PhD linguists and tested by real families. There are many different games you can play with them, so it is a fun way to learn and practice vocabulary in the target language. The photos are clear and colorful and help kids learn practical vocabulary.

But what my kids really love is that you can scan a QR code on each card and hear the pronunciation! This is wonderful for tech-loving kids, but also for parents who aren’t native speakers themselves. You know your child is being exposed to the correct pronunciation in Spanish by a native speaker!

We sampled the Around the Home flashcard set. There is also an Animals flashcard set, plus a set of 3 posters of favorite animals and objects, also with audio!

I highly recommend this for anyone teaching their child Spanish. Try it yourself, with the exclusive discount code ADMONKEY for 10% off your Amazon order, good through April 31, 2018!

Jan 192018
 
 January 19, 2018  bilingualism, Book Reviews, Literacy, multiculturalism, Spanish, Valentine's Day Comments Off on Valentine’s Day Mini Book: Speaking of Love

With Valentine’s Day coming up, it’s the perfect time to talk to children about love and how it unites us as one human family. I wanted to emphasize that no matter how different we may seem, we all experience love, so I created this free printable Valentine’s Day mini book that teaches how to say “love” in five different languages. It’s a fun way to celebrate the holiday and to teach children an important life lesson. Scroll down to download your copy!

Valentine's Day Mini Book: Speaking of Love | Alldonemonkey.com

Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of Love for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

Valentine’s Day Mini Book: Speaking of Love

When teaching children about the world, it’s important to emphasize that despite our differences, we have so much in common. Love is one of the most universal qualities that we share, and this free Valentine’s Day mini book shows children how to say “love” in five different languages: Spanish, French, German, Arabic, and Mandarin Chinese.

There is also a matching page (with answer key), so it is easy to use as a fun classroom activity.

Related Post: Teaching Children to Choose Love

To download your copy simply click on the link below:

Download your free Valentine’s Day Mini Book: Speaking of Love

And thank you to EduClips for the lovely bird clip art I used in the Valentine’s Day Mini Book!

Another great way to teach kids about love as a universal language is the gorgeous new children’s book Love from Matt de la Peña, author of the acclaimed children’s book Last Stop on Market Street (read my full review). This lovely new work focuses on how we all experience love in its myriad forms – from a beautiful sunset to laughter or the sound of a parent’s voice. I love the emphasis on recognizing love in the simple, ordinary moments, like playing in sprinkler during the summer or lying in the grass and looking up at the trees.

But love is more than just sunshine and rainbows – it’s also the hug when you’re scared or someone waking at dawn to go to work. This book doesn’t shy away from childhood fears and tragedies, but it handles them gently and reminds children that through it all, they are always surrounded by love, love, love.

And of course I adore the diverse images in the books – in particular a girl in sneakers and a hijab enjoying the beauty of a spring day. The illustrations go a long way towards helping children understand that no matter how different we may look, we all experience love and the simple joys of life.

I highly recommend this book as a wonderful way to celebrate the love that surrounds us and remind children of the beauty in the ordinary.

Related Post: Picture Books About Love

Love Blog Tour

This post is part of the blog tour to celebrate the release of Love by Matt de la Peña. Be sure to check out all the posts below!

WEEK ONE
January 8 – Margie’s Must Reads – Mood Board
January 9 – DoodleMom’s Homeschooling Life – Review and Review and Creative (lesson plan/unit study)
January 10 – The Keepers of the Books – What Love Means to different age groups
January 11 – The Children’s Book Reviews – Creative
January 12 – Books4yourkids – Creative
WEEK TWO
January 15 – Happily Ever Elephants – Review + Kids quotes on what love is to them.
January 16 – Crayon Freckles – Creative Learning Activity
January 17 – My Book Bloom – Review and Craft
January 18 – My Little Poppies – Activity
January 19 – All Done Monkey – Lesson plan or activity.
WEEK THREE
January 22 – Mundie Moms – Ask 7th graders what they think of the definition of “love”
January 23 – Wandering Bark Books – Spotlight
January 24 – Little Lit Book Series – Arts and Crafts Post
January 25 – Between the Reads – Review AND exploring what love means in today’s society and what it means to me
January 26 – The Plot Bunny – Old Valentine’s Mood Board
WEEK FOUR
January 29 – Just Commonly – “Love is” Collage
January 30 – Inspiration Laboratories – Artwork demonstrating love
Jul 242017
 
 July 24, 2017  bilingualism, Education, Spanish Comments Off on Teaching a Second Language with Montessori

I have always been intrigued by the Montessori method. I loved its gentleness, focus on hands-on learning, and emphasis on learning about other cultures. What you may not know is that Montessori is also a wonderful way of teaching a second language! Here are some great resources for teaching your child another language using Montessori. Share your experiences in the comments!

Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of the Montessori Inspiration at Home bundle for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a commission at no extra charge to you.

Teaching a Second Language with Montessori | Alldonemonkey.com

Teaching a Second Language with Montessori

The Montessori method of teaching a second language follows the general Montessori principles of starting early, trusting your child, and following their interests. So the focus is on providing a stimulating environment in the second language with activities that interest them, allowing them to experiment and try on their own, and not pushing them to activities they do not want to do. (As any bilingual parent will tell you, not following the last rule will turn most kids off learning the new language!)

If you are considering Montessori but aren’t sure where to begin here are some great resources to get you started, including an AMAZING one you won’t want to miss!

A bilingual Montessori homeschool setup

Tons of bilingual Montessori printables

Raising multilingual Montessori kids

Raising a bilingual child the Montessori way

Montessori Inspiration at Home - Toddler Series

I am thrilled to share with you the Montessori Inspiration at Home Toddler series, now on sale! This is an amazing resource for those interested in teaching a second language with Montessori or anyone wanted to use the Montessori method to teach their little ones. The bundle pack includes the new Language book (which just launched on July 19) and the earlier Practical Life Skills book (both of which can also be purchased separately).

Montessori Inspiration at Home: Language is designed for caregivers who want to nurture their toddler’s language development. The 100+ pages of ideas are so easy to follow, with simple instructions, printables, and photos – perfect even if you have little background in the Montessori method. The 12 chapters give you a basic background in Montessori as well as activities to build those pre-reading and pre-writing skills, plus crossing the midline, sound games, the 3-period lesson, teaching a second language, and more!

There are over 200 pages of printable resources, including materials in Spanish! So if you are working to create a stimulating, bilingual environment for your child, you won’t want to miss this!

I love how easy the Montessori Inspiration at Home Toddler series makes it to get started with Montessori. It gives you all the tools you need and equips you with the confidence to do it! As soon as I started reading, I felt so inspired about my own homeschooling and how I can adapt it to use the Montessori method with my little ones. I highly this incredible resource as a way to educate yourself and your child, especially if you are interested in teaching a second language with Montessori.

Montessori Inspiration at Home Bundle SALE

And if you get your copy by July 26, 2017, you can more than 50% offDon’t miss this opportunity – get your copy today!

Jul 062017
 

I’m always so excited when I come across books that encourage my children to read in Spanish. Bilingual books are great choices for children learning a language, because it can help increase the reader’s vocabulary by including text in their primary language. Even though they are still learning, they are able to read more complex story lines because they can check their comprehension as they go. This is perfect for my kids, who sometimes get frustrated at having to read “easy” books in Spanish because of their more limited vocabulary. Here is a group of wonderful new bilingual books your kids will enjoy, from picture books to early chapter books! Be sure to enter our giveaway of one of these books below – details at the end of this post!

New Bilingual Books for Kids of All Ages | Alldonemonkey.com

Disclosure: I received complimentary copies of the books below for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

New Bilingual Books for Kids of All Ages

Bosley Goes on Safari (Bosley Se Va de Safari) is the sixth book in the picture book series the Adventures of Bosley Bear. In this book, Bosley travels to the African plains to go on safari. There he meets many friendly animals and learns that despite their differences, they all are alike on the inside – a really fun way to teach young children about embracing diversity! This is a very engaging story, especially since what child doesn’t love learning about animals like lions and monkeys? We had fun acting it out as part of our Spanish lesson for the day! I love having the highlighted vocabulary words in the side-by-side Spanish and English texts. And the grammar is simple enough that my kids were able to follow along and enjoy the story without getting tripped up with Spanish beyond their level.

I’m so happy to share that we are giving away a copy of this wonderful book to one lucky winner – open worldwide! See the end of this post for details!

The Little Doctor /El Doctorcito is a wonderful book to encourage kids to dream big! But this is more than just a book about a boy who decides he wants to be a doctor when he grows up. Salvador also gains motivation when he learns first hand what non-English speakers like his beloved abuelita have to deal with when they go to the doctor. When he accompanies his grandmother to the local clinic, Salvador sees how crowded it is and how difficult it is for her to understand the paperwork. But the worst is the physician himself, who is so rushed that he barely even looks at Salvador or his grandmother before running back out the door to see the next patient! Salvador decides to become a doctor so he can be the kind of patient, caring doctor he wishes his grandmother had. A beautiful story about compassion and becoming the change we want to see in the world! I also love that it uses a situation that many bilingual children find themselves in, of being the translators for family members with limited English.

To raise compassionate boys, it is important to start early. Esteban De Luna, Baby Rescuer! /Esteban De Luna, Rescatador De Bebés! is a sweet book that shows a boy who learns that caring for others is a perfect way to be a real superhero. Esteban is disappointed that his superhero cape doesn’t give him any real powers – he can’t fly or leap over tall buildings – yet when he finds an abandoned doll at the park, he soon discovers that his cape can help him do something amazing. When refashioned as a baby carrier, it helps him rescue the doll from the rainstorm! The symbolism in this book is fantastic, as the cape itself is reimagined to help Esteban learn to take care of others, not by swooping in like a traditional superhero but by gently holding his “baby” close and keeping it safe.

What child can’t relate to the delicious anticipation of waking up on their birthday to wonder about the wonderful surprises to come? In A Surprise for Teresita / Una Sorpresa Para Teresita, young Teresita learns just how difficult it can be to wait for a birthday gift. On the morning that Tío Ramón is to bring her a birthday surprise, he seems to take much longer than usual to arrive on Teresita’s block as he does the rounds through her New York neighborhood selling piraguas (snow cones). As she waits for her surprise, we witness the sights and sounds of a Puerto Rican neighborhood from a child’s point of view. A wonderful celebration of a vibrant community and the joy of a birthday gift from a loved one.

A super fun book to read with kids is El Torneo De Trabalenguas / the Tongue Twister Tournament. There is a tongue twister contest, and you get to play along! Which of the quirky contestants do you think should win? And how many of these tongue twisters can you say – in English or Spanish? Fun to read together with your kids or to use in the classroom! These tongue twisters are so much fun and will challenge even grownups! Includes many bonus tongue twisters at the end of the story.

For children ready for a chapter book, we love A Mystery Bigger Than Big / Un misterio mas grande que grandisimo. It is the fourth installment in the Mickey Rangel mystery series, based on a boy with a certificate on his wall from a real online detective course. When a new girl moves into Mickey’s Texas middle school, the young detective is on the case to figure out what her story is. Why is she so quiet and where did she come from? Despite rumors flying around school that she is the child of a drug lord or perhaps of Russian spies, Mickey discovers that she’s really an immigrant from Guatemala. But this discovery only leads to more questions – why would she leave her home, and how could she leave her family behind? A great book to explore the topic of immigration in an honest but heartfelt way.

Rooster Joe and the Bully / El Gallo Joe Y El Abusón is another great bilingual read for older kids. It focuses on the all important topic of bullying, and the importance of standing up for what’s right. I love that middle schooler Joe’s grandfather draws on their cultural heritage to teach him these lessons, by drawing on the stories of courageous people like César Chávez who fought for the rights of those that others looked down on. With his grandfather’s guidance and his own identification with the brave roosters he loves to draw, Joe comes up with a plan to end the bullying not just for him but for all of the students in his class.

Giveaway

Enter for a chance to win a copy of Bosley Goes on Safari (Bosley Se Va de Safari) a wonderful new bilingual picture book! (see review above). All you have to do is comment below with your child’s current favorite book to read! Contest is open worldwide, ends Wednesday, July 12 at midnight PT. Winner will be chosen randomly from the eligible entries.

Feb 272017
 
 February 27, 2017  bilingualism Comments Off on Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft

I barely played video games growing up and even as an adult never found them very entertaining, at least, not compared to reading a book or, you know, hanging out with real live people or feeling the sunshine on my face. Yet my children love them and so I have come to appreciate video games as fun and often brain-building activities. I have even logged some time playing their favorite, Minecraft, though I have no idea what I am doing! It is quite humbling to have your 4 year old sigh as he explains something to you again. It seemed an apt metaphor for bilingual parenting, which is also incredibly challenging but rewarding. Here are the ways I have discovered that bilingual parenting is like Minecraft.

Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft | Alldonemonkey.com

Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft

– Often the world you are operating in can seem very surreal.

– You find yourself doing things you never thought you would.

– You can still have lots of fun even if most of the time you don’t know what is going on.

– Some days everyone is building together peacefully (Creative Mode), while other days you’re being attacked constantly by strange creatures (Survival Mode).

– Your children often understand more than you do.

– You don’t really need a lot of gear, but it can help, though the wide range of choices can be confusing.

– You find yourself using vocabulary (like “OPOL” or “creeper”) that your pre-child self wouldn’t recognize.

– Some days you’re just happy if you know what your children are saying.

– You try to act like you’re the one in charge, but eventually you realize that you are part of a world your kids have created and you all have to work together if you want to accomplish anything.

– You are more likely to build something amazing (or survive attacks) if you have others helping you.

– Sometimes everything is going great, but other times you are surrounded by creatures (your children or nay sayers) that explode if you even look at them.

– You are humbled by how much you have left to learn, at the same time as you are proud of what you have managed to accomplish.

– Every day is an adventure that challenges your creativity and endurance, but that in the end is always worth it.

the piri-piri lexicon

This post is part of the month-long series A-Z of Raising Multilingual Parenting, from the piri-piri lexicon. Be sure to stop by and see some of the other articles in this incredible collection about bilingual parenting!

Jan 162017
 
 January 16, 2017  bilingualism, Spanish Comments Off on 3 Must-Have Resources for Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers

Thank you to MommyMaestra for this post on 3 must-have resources for parents of Spanish-speaking preschoolers!

Many parents feel that the best time to learn multiple languages is when children are small and their brains are more efficient at processing language. And today, more and more parents are working hard to pass on their heritage language to their children. For Hispanics, that means Spanish tools and resources are in high demand, but sometimes hard to find. While children can learn languages simply through communication with family and friends, there are a few tools that parents should stock up on to help them make the learning process extra fun.

3 Must-Have Resources for Parents with Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers | Alldonemonkey.com


If you have Spanish-speaking preschoolers at home, check out these must-have resources.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

3 Must-Have Resources for Parents with Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers

Bilingual Books

Lucky for us, the number of Latino children’s literature is increasing (albeit slowly). But for preschoolers, there are quite a few exceptional titles that not only teach them basic skills such as numbers, colors, shapes, and letters, but they teach these concepts in Spanish! And don’t forget books with traditional nursery rhymes and fingerplays which were originally created to help children learn. Some of my favorites include:

Related Post: Favorite Homeschool Resources for Teaching Spanish

Bilingual Music

There are so many great musicians who have recently come out with fun and educational albums in Spanish for children. Research shows that music is a great learning tool for children because the repetitive rhythms help children remember the concepts being taught. And it is easy to see how this works when you listen to the joyful songs available for kids. Make listening to music a part of your daily routine. And some of these musicians even have fun music videos to enhance your child’s learning. From dinosaurs to opposites, your children will move and sing their little hearts out to these outstanding albums currently available for purchase online as MP3 downloads or CDs:

Related Post: 3 Easy Ways to Use Music to Teach Preschool Spanish

Spanish Apps

While I strongly advise limiting your child’s access to tech, you might as well ensure that their time spent staring at a screen be educational. There are quite a few remarkable apps that are available for both iOS, Android, and Kindle. All of them are vibrant and engaging, but I encourage parents to sit with your child the first time or two to ensure that the app is appropriate for their age. Here are my favorite apps for preschoolers:

About the Author

MonicaMonica Olivera is a homeschooling mother of two and a freelance education writer. Her site, MommyMaestra.com, helps Hispanic parents get more involved in their children’s education by providing resources, tips, and opportunities. She is also the co-founder of Latinas for Latino Lit and the content creator of the Latino Children’s Summer Reading Program, the first national, online program designed specifically for Latino families. Her education articles have appeared in numerous online sites such as NBCNews, latinamom.me, and PBSParents. To learn more, visit her About.me page.

Connect with Monica on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Dec 202016
 
 December 20, 2016  bilingualism, Book Reviews, Geography Comments Off on Travel Books for Kids: Top Cities

I love books that beckon children to travel and to imagine themselves as the heroes in great adventures. The travel books for kids highlighted below do this by focusing on particular cities – Kyoto, Paris, Mumbai, and London – and introducing young readers to the sights and culture of these noteworthy locales.

Travel Books for Kids: Top Cities

Disclosure: I received complimentary copies of the books below for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

Travel Books for Kids

Learn about Kyoto along with a young girl traveling there with her grandfather in Megumi’s First Trip to Kyoto. This is a really lovely book. The illustrations are wonderful, and I love that through the story we learn language and culture as Megumi and her grandfather count the things they will see in Kyoto: 10 bonsai trees, 9 orange koi, and so on. Japanese words are sprinkled in throughout the story, with footnotes giving the meaning and pronunciation. At the end there are also fun facts, a map, and Japanese numbers 1-10. But beyond this, what really makes the book come to life is the close relationship between Megumi and her grandfather. The affection between them lends a warmth to this story and will attract young readers even as they learn more about this beautiful city.

Related Post: Global Adventure Books for Kids

Take your kids on a gentle adventure through Paris with Beep Beep In Paris. Beep Beep is an adorable little red car who has adventures throughout Paris with his friend Chocolat the Cat (who has a habit of disappearing to eat desserts!) Poor Beep Beep does have some minor mishaps, but he is always helped by Chocolat, who helps Beep Beep feel at home in this new city. I have read this book many times with my preschooler, who loves the curious little car and his feline friend. (I actually won this book a few years ago from a friend’s blog: read her review of the book!) This sweet bilingual French and English book is a great way to practice vocabulary and take a virtual tour of the major landmarks of the city of lights. Read it with a cup of hot chocolat!

I was excited that our friends that wrote a wonderful Diwali book are now back with a new Maya and Neel adventure! Let’s Visit Mumbai! (Maya & Neel’s India Adventure Series, Book 2) is a fun, beautifully done story about two siblings from the US who are exploring Mumbai with their pet squirrel Chintu. Kids aren’t the only ones who will learn from this book – I never knew that Mumbai was originally a group of 7 islands! And did you know that Bollywood comes from Mumbai? There is even an “info zoom” spread about Bollywood as well as another on the famous dabbawallas who deliver food throughout Mumbai. The graphics are so colorful and engaging, and the story packs in a lot of information in a natural way. And I love that just as in Let’s Celebrate 5 Days of Diwali! there is a visual recap of the adventure at the end of the story. My only complaint about this (and the other books on this list) is that they don’t come with samples of the mouthwatering foods they feature!

Travel Books for Kids: Click the Book - London

If you are looking for innovative travel books for kids and/or want one that is customizable in two languages, you need to check out Click! London. This fun-filled adventure is not only a fast-paced story for children about London, it is also fully bilingual, in the languages of your choice! (Right now Spanish, English, and Italian are available, with more to come). Come along as two children take a wild, somewhat surreal ride through the sights of London!

Oct 182016
 

Bilingual Letter Craft: Q is for Que and Question | Alldonemonkey.com

We love simple learning activities, especially ones that do double duty to teach English and Spanish. This bilingual letter craft for “Q” is easy but really makes an impact – plus it’s fun!

Since we are focusing on biliteracy (that is, learning to read and write in both languages), as my preschooler is learning his letters I am making sure he has some examples of words that start with those letters in Spanish. So “C” is not just for car but also calabaza (pumpkin), and so on.

So when we came to the letter “Q,” I came up with this simple bilingual letter craft that works well in English and Spanish. The main point of the lesson is that “Q” turns you into a detective (or scientist). In English, “Q” is for Question, while in Spanish “Q” is for ¿Qué? (What?) So when you ask a question (or say “¿Qué?”) then you are a detective solving a mystery.

First we practiced asking questions and trying to answer them (try to include some silly ones!) and I also had them point to various objects around the room and ask “¿Qué es eso?” (“What is this?”) Again, be sure to encourage some silliness! (They, of course, pointed at each other or the baby: “Qué es eso??” in mock frightened voices).

After a bit of this, we did our bilingual letter craft, where the “Q” is designed to look like a magnifying glass.

Bilingual Letter Craft: Q is for ¿Qué? and Question

Materials:

Cardstock or thin cardboard

Scissors

Tape or glue

Markers (optional)

Instructions:

For each student, cut out a circle and a stick to form the letter “Q.” (You can also have the students practice their cutting skills but cutting out these shapes themselves). You can vary the size of the letters, but you want them at least as large as a magnifying glass. (We made ours quite a bit bigger).

Have the students tape or glue the stick into the correct position to make the letter “Q.” The stick should be mostly on the outside of the circle, so that it looks like a handle for the magnifying glass.

Bilingual Letter Craft: Q is for Que and Question | Alldonemonkey.com

Pretending to investigate an “injury”

Bilingual Letter Craft: Q is for Que and Question | Alldonemonkey.com

That’s it! Be sure to let them have fun being detectives and scientists with their “Q” magnifying glasses.

31 Days of ABC - October 2016 | Alldonemonkey.com

After taking a break last year due to the arrival of Baby #3, we are back with one of my favorite series, the 31 Days of ABC! You can look forward to 31 more days of activities, crafts, books, apps, and more, all dedicated to teaching young children the alphabet.

I am so happy to be working with an amazing group of kid bloggers, who will be sharing their amazing ideas with us in the coming days. And this year for the first year we are also adding a giveaway, so be sure to scroll to the end and enter for a chance to win!

So join us as we jump, skip, hop, and read our way through the alphabet this October!

Don’t forget to follow our 31 Days of ABCs Pinterest board for even more great ABC ideas!



31 Days of ABC

Teaching the ABCs – October 1

All Done Monkey: Creating a Preschool Letter of the Week Curriculum

A – October 2

Frogs and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails: Apple Scented Glitter Glue and Apple Craft

B – October 3

Witty Hoots: How to Make Fabulous Button Bookmarks

C – October 4

Preschool Powol Packets: Construction Truck Preschool Action Rhyme

D – October 5

ArtsyCraftsyMom: Printable Dinosaur Alphabet Sequencing Puzzle

E – October 6

Preschool Powol Packets: Elephant Art Project and Thailand Lesson

F – October 7

Spanglish Monkey: Spanish-English ABC Flashcards

G – October 8

Royal Baloo: Simple Ghost Painting Project

H – October 9

Peakle Pie: Hide and Seek

I – October 10

Look! We’re Learning!: Insect Activities for Kids

J – October 11

All Done Monkey: Olmec Jaguar Craft

K – October 12

Preschool Powol Packets: I Am a Kite Action Rhyme for Preschool

L – October 13

Raising a Trilingual Child: Letter Learning with a Multilingual Twist

M – October 14

Creative World of Varya

N – October 15

Peakle Pie: Narwhal Fingerprint Pictures

O – October 16

For the Love of Spanish: O es de Oso

P – October 17

Little Hiccups: P is for Places, A Travel ABC Book

Q – October 18

All Done Monkey

R – October 19

Sugar, Spice & Glitter

S – October 20

Crafty Mama in ME

T – October 21

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes

U – October 22

Witty Hoots

V – October 23

Creative World of Varya

W – October 24

Creative World of Varya

X – October 25

All Done Monkey

Y – October 26

Our Daily Craft

Z – October 27

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes

123’s – October 28

Hispanic Mama

Prewriting – October 29

Sugar Aunts

Books, Songs, & Apps – October 30

The Jenny Evolution

Alphabet Clip Cards – October 31

The Kindergarten Connection

Find more great resources in 31 Days of ABCs 2013 and 2014!

Giveaway

Don’t forget to enter for a chance to win this great prize package, open internationally!

Kidloland

3 month subscription to the Kidloland app, which includes 575+ interactive nursery rhymes, songs, stories, and educational activities to help children learn ABCs, animals, fruits, vegetables, shapes and more!

Alphabet Experts Mega Bundle: 31 Days of ABC Giveaway

The Alphabet Experts Mega Bundle from Kindergarten Connections contains 500+ of alphabet printables, including tons of activities for each letter of the alphabet! ($58.50 value)

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