Jul 172013
 
 July 17, 2013  food, Summer, World Citizen Wednesdays Comments Off on World Citizen Wednesdays #33: Summertime Treats Around the World

Summertime Treats Around the World - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What are favorite summertime treats for kids where you are?

Natalie of Mouse Grows, Mouse Learns: Well, now I am also “here”, but back home in Belarus we had a summer drink called kvass. It’s a drink made out of fermented rye bread, and we could buy it from a special stalls that were selling it. I have never tried to make it at home, but looked up a recipe out of curiosity.
The drink is not alcoholic (by Russian standards anyway), and children could buy and drink it anytime.

MaryAnne of Mama Smiles: Watermelon!!! Also juice pops.

Leanna of All Done Monkey: We love ice cream and popsicles.

Annabelle of the piri-piri lexicon: Ice cream, ice pops or any other way you like to call frozen deserts. We now make our own too. Great way to get the kids eating fruits.

Jill of Moms Gone Global: During our long, hot summer days in Florida, we’ve been enjoying frozen grapes! They’re fun to eat, nutritious and quite refreshing!

Ute of expatsincebirth: Watermelon (as much as you can get!), juice pops, ice cream in Italy and ice cream, all sorts of berries (in cakes, juice pops etc.) in Switzerland/Germany.  We did frozen fruit too, and frozen deserts are always a treat!

Sarita of A Hotchpotch Hijabi in Italy: In Italy they’re all about gelato and kinder.

Amanda of Miss Panda Chinese: Here are the traditional and popular iced drinks you will find in Taiwan. Jelly Fig drink- 愛玉 – Ai yu: a transparent light yellow colored jello pieces in sweet water with ice. Maison drink – 仙草 – Xian cao: black jello pieces in sweet water with ice. White Gourd drink – 冬瓜茶 – Dong Gua tea: a yummy sweet drink made from sweet white gourd cubes. We also make our own red beans or green beans pops at home. Yum!

I don’t have the recipes for making the Jelly Fig Jello, Maison Jello, and white gourd cubes because people buy the jellos and cubes in the day market. We cube the fig jello and put them in the sweetened lemon water. We cube the Maison jello and put them in the sweetened water. As to the white gourd cube, we cook it in the boiling water until it dissolves. I make the red beans and green beans pops at home. One cup of red/green beans with 5 to 6 cups of water. Boil until the beans are tender. Add dark brown sugar. Cool and freeze. You can add some condensed milk on the red bean pops when you are ready to eat it.

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: Watermelon and apples are favorites in the summer. Love that my boys want hydrating fruits after playing outside in the heat. We also get icees/slushies in the summer as treats sometimes too!

Miwa of cranes and clovers: Here in Japan we enjoy anmitsu and kakigori. Anmitsu is a dessert with small cubes of jelly made from seaweed served with fruit and sweet red bean paste. Kakigori is basically the same thing as snow cones, but a little bit fluffier. I love kakigori topped with matcha (green tea syrup).

Juliette of The Art of Home Education: (Water)melon, ice cream, popsicles, rainbow fruit -> different colorful fruits on a stick. Netherlands

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share: Ice cream and watermelon

Ana of SpanglishBaby: We’re all about watermelons, peaches and paletas every summer day!

Kim of Mama Mzungu: Well, it’s “summer” all year long here on the equator, but kids these parts love chomping on sugar cane and fresh watermelon as a treat!

Becky of Kid World Citizen: LOTS of batidos/smoothies– milk, fruit, and some sugar!:) WHen we mix in cashews, almonds, or peanuts we call them power smoothies for swim team.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website, liking us on Facebook, subscribing to our Facebook feed, or following us on Twitter and Pinterest!

Jul 102013
 

Learn a New Language - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

If you could learn a new language, what would it be and why?

Olga of The European Mama: Hindi and other languages spoken in India, so that I could understand Bollywood movies.  Or, also something with a different alphabet (Hindi and the other languages spoken in India have this, but so do Russian, Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese or Chinese and many other would go with Russian because it’s close to Polish and I am lazy).

Ute of expatsincebirth: I would learn Arabic because I have many friends who talk Arabic and I would like to be able to talk their mothertongue with them and I like the Arabic literature.

Stephen of The Head of the Heard: French. So that all the years I spent trying to learn it at school wouldn’t have been wasted. So that I could find my French teacher and prove her prediction that I would never speak another language wrong by shouting at her in flawless French. And because I think it is the next language I would introduce my son to so it would be good to provide an example for him.

Amanda of Maroc Mama: Arabic which I hopefully will be learning in a more formalized way soon. I’d really like to be able to have a conversation with my mother-in-law without the aid of someone translating.

Tara of Tara Kamiya: Something nobody expects me to speak….Icelandic?LOL

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: Spanish so that it would be easier to raise our children bilingually, since my husband is fluent and has extended family in the Dominican Republic. I would also love to get back into learning Arabic as well, since it makes me sad to think I used to do a pretty good job having conversations in Egyptian Arabic and can now barely remember a thing!

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: French I wanted to learn French in high school when we were living in the USA (it was free and part of the curriculum), but then my Mom moved us to Puerto Rico so my dreams of learning a 3rd language went out the window! They offered private French language lessons but they weren’t accessible (too expensive $$, and far away).

Melissa of Where going havo?: Welsh or something else with relatively limited geographic distribution, so my husband and I could use it as a super-secret language everywhere else in the world.

Helene of Ici on ne dessine pas de mouton: Russian, Japanese.

Julie of Open Wide the World: Visaya (dialect from Philippines), so I would know when my in-laws were telling me I was eating one thing when really it is another. (Of course, I can always tell by the looks on their faces that they’re up to something, so I take small bites at first…)

Cecilia of Spanglish House: Latin mother of all tongues. Or Quechua and Aymara.

Stephanie of InCultureParent: Hands down Arabic, and I plan to learn it. I can’t wait to be able to understand my husband when he talks to the kids and be able to interact more with the whole Moroccan side of the family.

Carol of A French American Life: Gaelic, so I could understand all those haunting Irish songs.

Giselle of Kids Yoga Stories: Indonesian (or Balinese), so I could live in Bali to write children’s books, attend yoga retreats, talk to the locals, and explore the island.

Alyson of World Travel Family: I don’t think I’d pick one language, I choose lots of little bits of multiple languages, enough to get by, be polite and order food or book a room. We’re off to Thailand next week, I hope to get further that Sawadee ka. I love the way the languages in SE Asia change subtlely as you move from country to country.

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share: I would love to learn Italian since my husband is Italian, but have also always wanted to learn French (I took Spanish in school). I also would love to learn Brazilian Portuguese since so many people in our area speak it.

Becky of Kid World Citizen: I want to learn Mandarin, but I also LOVE love love the sound of Portuguese and am currently trying to master more of it…

Leanna of All Done Monkey: I have always wanted to learn French, but Farsi is at the top of my list. I grew up around a lot of Iranians, plus most of the Bahá’í Writings are in either Farsi or Arabic.  It would be so cool to read in the original language.

Jody of Mud Hut Mama: Chinyanja so I can communicate with people at our new home and feel settled in and part of the community sooner rather than later.

Cordelia of Multilingual Mama: I should say Spanish as it would help with my kids becoming trilingual. I should also say Thai as I live in Thailand but truth is I would want to learn Turkish. I am utterly in love with the sound and the country.

Varya of Creative World of Varya: Portuguese. I love the sound of it!

Jennifer of World Moms Blog: I have been taking French classes for a while now and am getting a little better, but I also am interested in learning Lebanese because my grandfather was from Lebanon and my older relatives have always spoken it around me since I was a baby! I need to take the plunge!!!

Kali of For the Love of Spanish: My husband’s family is Italian, so I have been wanting to learn Italian so I can speak with his relatives if we ever get the chance to visit them in Italy! I would also like to learn Vietnamese or Mandarin as those are the foreign languages I encounter most where I live (besides Spanish). Fun question!

Madre Exilio of Maternidad en 2 Lenguas:  This question is really hard to answer I would like to speak all languages in the world but If I would have to chose only one I would probably go for Japanese. Why? because linguistics say it is a real challenge and because I really like Japanese art, specially some Japanese painters and authors.

Kristen of Toddling in the Fast Lane: Right now French because we’re going to Paris is a few short weeks!

Melissa of Vibrant Wanderings: I would love to achieve fluency in Russian, mostly just because I find it to be a fascinating language, but you’d better believe I’d be reading some of the great Russian classics in the original, too. I studied for a few years, and traveled to Russia, but I have lost virtually all of what I knew.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website, liking us on Facebook, subscribing to our Facebook feed, or following us on Twitter and Pinterest

Jun 262013
 

Patriotic Holidays Around the World - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What patriotic holidays did you grow up celebrating?  Are they the same ones you celebrate with your kids?

Olga of The European Mama: Polish Independence Day is November 11th, but we didn’t celebrate it other than we didn’t have to go to school. May 1till May 3rd are also free days (Labor day and Polish Constitution Day), and then there are Polish flags anywhere, and many people go on holidays in May. On August 1st, we celebrate the anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising in 1944, and at noon, all cars stop and beep for a minute to make us remember. In the Netherlands we don’t really celebrate any of these days…

Stephen of The Head of the Heard: The only thing we have in the UK is Bonfire Night or Guy Fawkes’ Day on November 5th, which celebrates the failure of the Catholic Guy Fawkes’ attempt to blow up parliament and the king in 1605. We have bonfires and fireworks which are either in people’s gardens or, more commonly nowadays, in big parks.

Varya of Creative World of Varya: Victory Day, May 9th. Dedicated to the Victory of Soviet Union in WW2.  November 7th – The Day of Great October Socialist Revolution. Russia used to use Julian Calendar and in Julian Calendar the revolution happened on October 25th. After the revolution Soviet Union accepted Gregorian Calendar and in this calendar the date is November 7th.

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Puerto Rico: November 19: Día del Descubrimiento de Puerto Rico (Discovery of Puerto Rico Day) It’s a big celebration in schools throughout the country focusing mainly on celebrating the culture and identity of Puerto Ricans; also called Semana de la Puertorriqueñidad. June 21: La Noche de San Juan. People flock to beaches to celebrate the patron of the capital San Juan, and the arrival of the summer solstice. One of the traditions is to fall on your back in the beach, and dunk yourself seven times at midnight to ward off evil spirits. This is a day of festivities music, dance, and food. Most of the people spend their day in the beach with families, and friends waiting until 12 midnight to celebrate.

Leanna of All Done Monkey: For 4th of July, it was always fireworks! If the local baseball team had a home game, we would go and watch the firework show there. On Memorial Day, we would usually do something as a family, like a day trip to a national park. We haven’t been very consistent about doing anything as a family yet with the boys, though maybe we’ll go see fireworks this year, not sure yet.  My husband grew up celebrating Independence Day in Costa Rica (Sept. 15). School kids usually make lanterns (a reference to the history of the day, when someone arrived carrying a lantern to announce that they were independent from Spain), and they participate in parades.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

Jun 192013
 

Music from Childhood - World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What music your family listen to when you were growing up?

Leanna of All Done Monkey: We listened to a lot of classical music, plus my mom loved John Denver, Simon & Garfunkel, Seals & Crofts, and Abba.

Niceno of Mixed Race is cool too: Seeing that am from the Caribbean … Reggae Music… Mostly Beres Hammond, Jimmy Cliff and Bob Marley.

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Latin music! Salsa (Héctor Lavoe, Willie Colón, Raphy Leavitt) and Merengue! and of course, Disco! (The Bee Gees, Abba, Donna Summer). Funny enough, to this day that’s what I prefer to listen to.

Emma of Muslimas’ Oasis: The Doors, Van Morrison, Neil young, Tracy Chapman, The Eagles, The Topp Twins, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton … I guess rock and roll and country mostly. But we listened to all sorts. John Lennon too, The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Bon Jovi, The Band, Robbie Robertsons later Native American inspired stuff, Bob Marley. Mum listened to different stuff than Dad (they were separated) so it depended who we were with too. I still like a lot of the same stuff and then some.

Madre Exilio of Maternidad en 2 Lenguas: This a good question Leanna I grew up with my dad listening to Pink Floyd, Police and Phil Collins my mum to Boleros (romantic music in Spanish). You made me remember me good times!

Stephen of The Head of the Heard: My dad listened to Irish Country (aarrggh!) music and people like Roy Orbison. My mum was a Stones fan and also loved Motown. We didn’t actually have much music in the house except for Sunday mornings when my dad would take over the record player. One thing I definitely inherited from my dad was an inability to hold a note.

Tara of Tara Kamiya: Top 40, Motown hits, Hip Hop which was new genre at the time. I am 36.

Olga of The European Mama: The Beatles (still my favorite), Rolling Stones, classical music and opera (especially Mozart, Verdi, and Gilbert&Sullivan) American country music (especially Loretta Lynn and Patsy Kline), German “Folksmusik” (my father really did, I still feel traumatized by it), French chansons (Dalida, George Brassens, Ives Montand and Edith Piaff), Russian music (such as Bulat Okudzava), Italian music, fado, Mexican music… you name it, my father listened to it.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: Bolivian folk music, salsa, we (the kids) liked Menudo ha!, the Beatles, Abba. My brother and I loved classics from the 80’s (I still do). My baby brother listens a lot of classical music, so I have learned to appreciate classical music, just listening to him practicing his piano. I love music and dancing!

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share: My parents listened to soft rock like Barbara Streisand. My sister and I loved Shaun Cassidy (as did all the girls our age) and for the most part all the Top 40 music of the time.

Kat of Hapa Mom: 1960s commercials and classical music. Lots of Suzuki method!

Varya of Creative World of Varya: My husband grew up listening pretty much everything 70s and 80s. I grew up listening Russian pop and folk + Classical music and of course – Bollywood!

Kristen of Toddling in the Fast Lane: The Beatles, Paul Simon, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Sesame Street. My dad listened to a lot of new age, Celtic, and my grandma loved the three tenors. My parents were always so surprised that we kids liked their music.

Cordelia of Multilingual Mama: A lot of opera, music like fats domino and classical music. My older brothers introduced me to queen, Jgeils band, the police, pink floyd, Rolling Stones, etc.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

http://toddlefast.blogspot.com/

Jun 122013
 

Tribute to Fathers - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

In honor of Father’s Day, share something you appreciate about a favorite father in your life:

Stephanie of InCultureParent: I totally appreciate that my husband gets the girls up, dressed, fed and to school everyday on his own, so that I can go to early morning yoga everyday and then get into my job on time.

Mary of Sprout’s Bookshelf: Love that my husband is such an involved dad. For the past 3 years, while I finished grad school, he picked up all the slack around the house and made things so much fun for our son. They have had some wonderful adventures together and their bond is so close as a result. Really helped ease my guilt at being constantly busy to know my son was enjoying fun times with Daddy!

Amanda of Expat Life with a Double Buggy: I appreciate that my dad has always encouraged me to be the best I can be – and take directions that make me happy!

Olga of The European Mama: I love that my husband always knows that I’m too tired before I do. That he is the funniest, cleverest, most intelligent person I know. That he tried hard to learn Polish for me and the children. And, I appreciate that my father installed in me the love of good food and cooking!

Jody of Mud Hut Mama: I really appreciate that my husband gets up every morning with our girls so that I can sleep a little longer and I love watching him play with our daughters and hearing their squeals of delight. I’m thankful to my own Dad for encouraging me to follow my dreams even when they took me far from home.

Miwa of cranes and clovers: I’m thankful to my dad for being so strict about speaking Japanese at home when I was a child. Since we lived in the States there was really no other place where we could use it. I hated the Japanese-at-home rule but I’m so grateful now because I managed to turn out bilingual. Hopefully I can be as influential to my daughter!

Varya of Creative World of Varya: I appreciated my father spending a lot of time with me as a child. I think it really helped me see how i would want my husband and a father of my children to be. Hence, I am forever grateful to have my husband taking full charge of children’s lives whenever he has a chance and no matter how tired he is. My older daughter has a very special connection with him and I hope the younger one will too!

MaryAnne of Mama Smiles: My dad spent hours reading aloud to me as a child. I love remembering those magical evenings as I read the same books aloud to my own kids now! He used to tell funny stories about how he and my mom “found us” when I was very small – my favorite involved them driving down the mountain and coming across a gigantic snowball – with all of us kids inside! He also told wonderfully vivid stories about his own childhood, including his repeated attempts to fly by leaping off the swing set with his mother’s dishtowel around his neck. He loved to take us places, and he now takes my kids on exciting outings when he comes to visit!

Leanna of All Done Monkey:  I have always loved that my dad is just a little off kilter and has a wonderful sense of humor.  Now that I am older, I also appreciate all the years he went to work every day for long hours to support us, and even though I know he must have been exhausted, he still came home and played “jags” with us on the floor and told us Mickey Mouse stories at bedtime.  And now I am lucky enough to be married to a wonderful man who works just as hard yet is also just as willing to run around and play with the kids when he gets home.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

Jun 052013
 

Great (Non-Parenting) Reads for Parents - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What was the last non-parenting book you read (and would you recommend it)?

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: I am currently reading Crime and Punishmentby Dostoevsky — cannot recommend yet as I have not finished it. But, I just finished A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future: Twists and Turns and Lessons Learnedby Michael J. Fox, an easy read full of life lessons intended for recent grads. If you are looking for something simple and entertaining to read and you like Michael J. Fox, then put it on the library list. It is a quick read, but I wouldn’t buy it. It was featured in my Weekly Library Challenge post this past week.

Kat of Hapa Mom: Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Home: No-Nonsense Advice that Will Inspire You to CLEAN like the DICKENS <– it was okay. But I’m not inspired to clean like the Dickens.  Before that, I re-read Girl of the Limberlost, I really enjoyed it and would highly recommend it.

Anoosh of Araña Mama: Finally got around to reading Wolf Halland was completely sucked in. And for something completely different, I read Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food. Excellent.

Varya of Creative World of Varya: I started reading a detective story by Joanna Chmielewska. I like her humour. We have her books translated into Russian. I always catch up on some reading when I travel home!

Jody of Mud Hut Mama: I just finished River God: A Novel of Ancient Egypt by Wilbur Smith and thoroughly enjoyed it. It brings you through life in ancient Egypt as told by a eunuch slave. It was my first Wilbur Smith book but I’ll definitely be looking for more. Before that I read A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah who was a child soldier in Sierra Leone. It’s a first hand account of how an average kid can become a killer and speaks about unimaginable brutality, tragedy and loss, but also courage, hope and human spirit. I really enjoyed how simply and honestly it was written.

Alyson of World Travel Family: I’m reading anything that’s free for Kindle at the moment. No, I wouldn’t recommend any of them, there is a reason they are free! I’m also reading lots of Lonely Planets, highly recommended.

Becky of Kid World Citizen: I just finished Home is a Roof Over a Pig: An American Family’s Journey in China, a memoir of a US family living in China. It gave a lot of insight into Chinese culture!

Stephanie of InCultureParent: There are so many unfinished books on my bedside table but one I actually finished was The Caliph’s House: A Year in Casablanca by Tahir Shah. Can’t wait to read more books by him.

Amanda of Expat Life with a Double Buggy: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel by Deborah Moggach – was a good read.  Just moved on to And the Mountains Echoed.

Amanda of Maroc Mama: Reading And the Mountains Echoed and totally in love with it.

Melissa of Where going havo?: The last book I finished was A Thousand Splendid Suns and I’m currently reading Jednooký král (historical fiction) and Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948 (Madeleine Albright), all three of which are excellent. Next maybe I’ll read one of the random Kindle purchases my toddler has made in the last few months.  He actually got away with it once or twice because my husband and I both thought the other had made the purchase. When “New York Times February 18, 2013” showed up, we knew something was up.  He also helps me learn about my new phone by turning on settings I have to figure out how to undo. He just wants to help. And broaden his horizons by extensive reading.  Those digital natives.

Olga of The European Mama: I am reading And the Mountains Echoed and loved it, it’s not as shocking as Khaled Hosseini’s other books, but beautifully written and at the same time touching, sad and up-lifting. I just finished reading Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brene Brown and I think it applies a lot to expats and parents raising multicultural children. Now my inner geek wants something to read, too so I am humouring her by re-reading Neuromancer.

Daria of Making Multicultural Music: Grace Lin’s: Where the Mountain Meets the Moon and Starry River of the Sky. Not children’s books but two volumes that weave Chinese folk legends into compelling stories about youth, hope and dreams. Enchanting, healing, could not put them down! Visit Grace’s site for more info.

Kim of Mama Mzungu: Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo. Non-fiction based on her 3 years living in Indian slums abutting a major airport. Reads life fiction. Poignant, insightful and heart-breaking. Read it!!

Giselle of Kids Yoga Stories: Just read Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail. A woman’s solo hike and her transformation. We also just got back from week in Tahoe and walked along bits of trail (few steps with our toddler toddling). Super inspiring! As a new mom, those hikes are for dreams only. Smile. Sigh.

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Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

May 292013
 

The Spice Cabinet - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What are the most used spices in your spice cabinet?

Olga of The European Mama: Cinnamon, curry, carraway,cardamom, thyme, oregano and rosemary

Homa of Growing Up Global: Turmeric

Stephanie of InCultureParent: Hands down cumin. I put it in almost everything.

Elika of Nightingale Creations: Cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, dried mint, dill, oregano

MaryAnne of Mama Smiles: Cinnamon and oregano

Amanda of Expat Life with a Double Buggy: Curry, chilli & ginger

Ute of expatsincebirth:  Salt, garlic, basilicum, cinnamon, curry, thyme, origano, rosemary.

Azarnoush of A toddler, his mum and their recipes: Cumin

Mary of Sprout’s Bookshelf: Cinnamon, cumin, oregano, berbere.  (Berbere is an Ethiopian blend of several spices – ground chili, fenugreek, ginger, cardamom and some others. Very spicy and sort of a smoky-ish flavor. Great in stews, with lentils, meat, potatoes, even eggs and popcorn).

Leanna of All Done Monkey: Salt, garlic powder, cinnamon, vanilla.  I use cumin and oregano and paprika too but not nearly as much.

Meera of MeeraSriram.com: Turmeric, homemade mix (of turmeric, chilli powder, corriander seeds), cumin, mustard seeds and asafoetida.

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Kosher salt, pepper, garlic salt, cumin, thyme, sage, and of course, for Puerto Rican dishes: adobo (mix of garlic powder, onion powder, salt, black pepper, dry orégano brujo) & sazón (mix of grounded salt, pepper, garlic, culantro, coriander, cumin, oregano, annatto (achiote))

Crystal of Crystal’s Tiny Treasures: Cinnamon, corriander, cumin, italian seasoning, pepper, chili powder, curry powder

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: Cinnamon, black pepper, steak grill spice, nutmeg, garlic sea salt, cajun spice

Amanda of Miss Panda Chinese: Garlic, garlic powder, garlic salt, black pepper, white pepper, dry chilly pepper, oregano, basil. And Chinese herb packs for beef noddle soup.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: For cooking, Garlic, Ginger, cinnamon, salt, pepper, hot pepper, oregano, parsley. For teas I use cinnamon, anis, chamomile, and peppermint.

Christi of Learning to Be the Light: Not sure it really qualifies as a spice, but aji amarillo is my go to! I add it to everything

Alyson of World Travel Family: Cinnamon, not in sweet things, in anything tomato sauce based and Indian curries. I’d say chilies, I have them with everything, but they are a fruit, not a spice. Then all the curry spices, cumin, turmeric, fenugreek, cardamom, coriander seed etc.

World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.com

Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

May 222013
 
 May 22, 2013  World Citizen Wednesdays Comments Off on World Citizen Wednesdays #26: Tongue Twisters

Tongue Twisters - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What are your favorite tongue twisters?

Annabelle of the piri-piri lexicon: My favourite one when I was learning English was ‘she sells seashells on the seashore’. In French: ‘Les chaussettes de l’archiduchesse sont-elles seches? Archi-seches?’ – are the socks of the duchess dry? Extra dry?

Leanna of All Done Monkey: In English: Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, how many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?  And in SpanishCompadre, cómpreme un coco.  Compadre, no compro coco.  Porque como poco coco como, poco coco compro.  (Buy me a coconut.  No, I don’t buy coconut.  Since I don’t eat much coconut, I don’t buy much coconut).

Cordelia of Multilingual Mama: French: Combien sont ces six saucissons. Ces six saucissons sont six sous. Si ces six saucissons sont six sous , ces six saucissons sont trop chère. Translates to How much are these six sausages? These six saus… Are six cents. If the six…. Are 6 cents, the 6 saus are too expensive. – clearly inflation has not been taken into account here.

Amanda of Miss Panda Chinese: In English: I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! In Chinese: Chī pú táo bù tǔ pú táo pí, bù chī pú táo dào tǔ pú táo pí. 吃葡萄不吐葡萄皮, 不吃葡萄 倒吐葡萄皮. (Eating the grapes not spitting the grape skin, not eating the grapes, spitting the grape skin.)

Melissa of Where going havo?: Of course there’s the classic Czech vowel-less tongue twister “Strč prst skrz krk,” (stick your finger through your neck), and I also like “Tři sta třicet tři stříbrných křepelek přeletělo přes tři sta třicet tři stříbrných střech” (one of the many versions of this one, Three hundred and thirty three silver quails flew over three hundred and thirty three silver roofs.) A Czech person once told me that the goal of tongue twisters in Czech is not to say them “five times fast” or as fast as possible, but rather to say them AT ALL.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: In Spanish: Tres tristes tigres trigaban trigo en un trigal. or Try saying, “Del pozo al pato del pato al pozo” super fast and many times oops you will be saying something else!

Olga of The European Mama: In Polish: Król Karol kupił królowej Karolinie korale koloru koralowego. (King Karol bought for Queen Karolina corals of coral colour). W czasie suszy szosa sucha, suchą szosą Sasza szedł (In drought, the street is dry, and on a dry street, Sascha walked). “W Szczebrzeszynie chrząszcz brzmi w trzcinie (in Szczebrzeszyn- a city, a bumblebee hummed in the cane), Rewolwer leży na kaloryferze (the gun is on the heating)…Polish is famous for the different “sh”-sounds, and they’re hard to pronounce for foreigners… and some Polish people as well.  And there is also: “Wyindywidualizowaliśmy się z rozentuzjazmowanego tłumu”- (We individualized ourselves from the enthusiastic crowd).  I also know one in German: Fischers frisch frisierter Fritze frißt frisch frittierte Frisch-Fisch-Frikadellen. Fisher’s freshly coiffed Fritze (a name, I think?) eats freshly fried fresh fish meat balls). And one in English: “How much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

Ute of expatsincebirth: Italian: Sopra la panca la capra campa, sotto la panca la capra crepa. (On the bench the goat lives, under the bench the goat dies), Sono un setacciasassi, ho un setaccio di sassi setacciati e un setaccio di sassi non setacciati, perché sono un setacciasassi (I’m a stone siever, I have a sieve with sieved stones and a sieve with not sieved stones, because I’m a stone siever), Mi attacchi i tacchi tu che attacchi i tacchi? Io attaccarti i tacchi a te? Attaccati te i tuoi tacchi tu che attacchi i tacchi! (Can you fix my heels, you who fix heels? Me fix your heels? Fix your heels (yourself) you who fix the heels) and the same in a dialect of Milan (Northern Italy): Tì che te tacchet i tacc, taccum a mì i me! Mì taccat i tacc a tì? Taccheti tì i tò tacc, tì che te tacchet i tacc! // German: Hundert hurtige Hunde hetzen hinter hundert hurtigen Hasen her (Hundert swift dogs chase hundert swift hares), Wenn Fliegen hinter Fliegen fliegen, fliegen Fliegen Fliegen nach. (If flies fly behind flies, the flies fly behind flies : this one plays with the same sound of the noun and the verb)

World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.com

Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

May 082013
 

The Best Gift My KIds Ever Gave Me - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week, in honor of Mother’s Day, we ask…

What is the best present you have ever received from your kids?

Melissa of Where going havo?: An iced coffee. When my daughter was about four, she and my husband were out together and stopped by the store for a snack. She led him straight to the shelf with the iced coffee I like and made him buy it and a snack for me. I loved that she thought of me and knew what I liked even though I wasn’t there.

Daria of Making Multicultural Music: I love and keep the “love notes”… even especially the silly ones and ones not written for holidays. I have one where my daughter (then six) drew 2 dinosaurs, a large one and a small one and the little one told the big one “I love you”.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: Besides wild flowers arrangements, sweet and funny notes and drawings. Last year we had a Derecho that hit the area where we live and our front tree was blown over. My husband asked my boys what could we do with the wood from the tree, and my boys suggested lamps for mommy, and they did it. They used branches and work on the stands, my husband took care of the shades. They are beautiful and I was truly surprised!

Varya of Creative World of Varya: My husband and my daughter usually treat me a lunch/dinner and mani-pedi. Plus, there is always some yummy dessert! Last year they made me a lovely Mother’s Day card. I still keep it.

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: My boys are young (3.5 and not quite 2). My favorite gifts are impromptu things like a flower they picked in the yard or a picture they color for me. Simple, but treasured.

Alyson of World Travel Family: We don’t do presents for Mother’s Day in our family. But my most memorable Mother’s Day breakfast in bed was in a tent in Townsville, Australia, on a semi deflated air mattress with a dip in the middle that made a nice little pool. My 2 year old had an accident. I was forced to stay there and enjoy my cup of tea.

Meera of InCultureParent: My kids are not big on art, but they give me these casually done pencil-drawings that capture our every day moments all the time – like us playing in the backyard or walking to the library and I love them! My most precious gift was a home-spa session my husband and the kids put together for my birthday – my little one was holding the two slices of cucumber on my eyes from falling, and my daughter came up with a banana face mask and a water- with- rose- petals from our garden bath for my feet

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: For Mother’s Day the cute cards he makes at his pre-school. He’s only 4 yrs. old and he loves picking flowers for me; and to draw and color so he’s always making “pictures” for Mommy. He’s also ‘s showering me with kisses. He grabs my face, and kisses my forehead, nose, cheeks, and yes my chin, too! LOLOL

Kim of The Educators’ Spin On It: One year my 8 year old son and my husband made gingerbread cookies from scratch. They both left little handwritten notes around the house with cookies for a Treasure Hunt with handpicked flowers at the end. He left work early to come home and do it with him after school while I was at work. It was the sweetest thing ever!

Amanda of Maroc Mama: Time. I’m not huge on gifts but having quiet time to myself, in my bed, watching movies is a magical gift for me!!

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share:Last year for my birthday my husband took her to a store and let her pick out what she wanted to give me. I got quite an arrangement of gifts (a candle snuffer, a horse hook to hang up and earrings I had planned on giving my mother but Hazel insisted I should keep them). Nothing we needed at the time, but things we have found good uses for and I knew she really loved them all.

Heidi of 2KuriousKids: All of the cute gifts made at school of course! But my kids recently took a picture of them and used craft sticks to make a cute frame out of it and wrote I love you Mom!

Stephanie of InCultureParent: The most adorable card with hand picked flowers, together with homemade breakfast when I woke up. And I always love the gifts they so proudly make at school for me too!

World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.com

Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

May 012013
 
 May 1, 2013  World Citizen Wednesdays Comments Off on World Citizen Wednesdays #24: When I Grow Up, I Want To Be…

When I Grow Up - World Citizen Wednesdays on Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Erin of The Usual Mayhem: A vet.

Olga of The European Mama: An ice cream vendor because then I woud make people happy

Annabelle of piri-piri lexicon: A teacher

Angelique of The Magic of Play: I wanted to get married and have a large family and after write books

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share: An inventor. I was going to invent something big and have my father as my gardener/butler.

Heidi of 2KuriousKids: Teacher or banker

Leanna of All Done Monkey: Writer.

Mary of Sprout’s Bookshelf: A librarian. . . and I’m finally almost there!

Kristen of Toddling in the Fast Lane: Always a mommy. And then either a writer, dancer, or singer. I really wanted to be famous as a kid. Not anymore!

Valerie of Glittering Muffins: A kindergarten teacher.

MaryAnne of Mama Smiles: A mom! Or a teacher, dancer (never took dance, though), artist, singer, or pianist. Or doctor.

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Flight attendant. I wanted to travel the world!

Melissa of Vibrant Wanderings: My dreams changed frequently, but writer and teacher were probably the longest running, and those are what stuck.

Varya of Creative World of Varya: A number of things. A ballerina first, a neuro-surgeon after, a veterinarian later and finally I became a teacher.

Cordelia of Multilingual Mama: First female president and a ballerina.

Ute of expatsincebirth: I had many dreams about what to become: a veterinarian (to help all the animals in the world), an architect (to build a house for everyone), a translator and a writer… well, I became a Dr. but not a medical one and do write a lot, I am translater too and am also a language teacher.

Jody of Mud Hut Mama: I also wanted to be a veterinarian and I wanted to build a log cabin in my parents’ backyard so I would never have to leave home – they like to tease me about that since I moved further away than any of my siblings.

Giselle of Kids Yoga Stories: A teacher!

Melissa of Where going havo?: A teacher, briefly an archeologist, and an author. Then I realized I don’t actually have any original ideas to write about…making my current profession of ‘translator’ a perfect fit! Other people’s ideas, my words.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: That is a good question, I wanted to have a Little House in the Prairie family, but at the same time I wanted to do what my dad does, He works with Rural Development in Bolivia.

Jennifer of The Good Long Road: A professional pianist. (Really from about age 8 and on, there was nothing else, just that). It took going to college on a piano scholarship to discover that it was not what I wanted to be when I grew up at all. Though, I do love that the trailer for my latest film (Smuggled) features classic music I arranged and performed for the project.

Madre Exilio of Maternidad en 2  Lenguas: I wanted to be a doctor, a surgeon to be more precise. My parents didn´t encourage me to do so and I regret I did not try it harder.  I do read a lot about our body, how to look after it, what kind of herbs and alternative medicine we can use to prevent potential health issues, so I guess I´m still passionate about human body’s functions and its capacity.

World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.com

Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

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