Apr 212015
 
 April 21, 2015  activities, music, Ridvan Comments Off on Celebrating the Festival of Ridvan with Music

This post was originally posted as part of the Walking Through the Garden of Ridván series and is reprinted here with permission from the author, Chelsea Lee Smith.

Ridván has come again and we are having fun celebrating each day with a little activity.

As we have been doing for the past three years, each day of Ridván the children receive a little note sharing a Ridvan related thought of the day (based on a quotation) with an activity to help discuss it. This year I’ve been putting the notes in our “homeschooling mail box” for them to open each morning after prayers.

Celebrating the Festival of Ridvan with Music | Alldonemonkey.com

Two of our activities so far have been based on music. Music is such a lovely way to introduce ideas to children, and listening in and participating in music-making can really uplift everyone’s spirit as well.

On the first day we attended our community’s Ridvan picnic, and shared a special song about Ridvan written and sung by Diana Howlett called “This is the Day.” The song is based on the three quotes below and you can find out more about the CD and even download the lyrics and sheet music on this page:

Verily I say, this is the Day in which mankind can behold the Face, and hear the Voice, of the Promised One. (Bahá’u’lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 10)

This is the Day whereon the Ocean of God’s mercy hath been manifested unto men…” (Bahá’u’lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 7)

This is the Day in which God’s most excellent favours have been poured out upon men…” (Bahá’u’lláh, The Proclamation of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 121)

Today our activity was singing the ever-famous song “Garden of Ridván” (to hear and watch a video, plus find the lyrics, visit this page). I also made it into a game by asking the boys to stand up and clap each time they heard the word “garden.” It was a lot of silly fun and I was reminded again how much children love to play and have fun with even the simplest of “games.”

Celebrating the Festival of Ridvan with Music | Alldonemonkey.com

So there are two songs we know for celebrating Ridván – do you know of any others?? Please share in the comments below!

Walking Through the Garden of Ridvan 2013This post is part of the Walking Through the Garden of Ridvan series, where members of Baha’i Mom Blogs are sharing ideas for celebrating Ridvan during all 12 days.

Follow along by visiting this page!

Dec 052014
 
 December 5, 2014  bilingualism, Kid Fun, music 11 Responses »

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

I received a complimentary copy of ¡Sabor! for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own.

Raising our children to be bilingual is important to us, and we are always looking for fun ways to encourage language learning.   So I was thrilled to receive a copy of the ¡Sabor! – a CD of Spanish learning songs from Whistlefritz – to review.

Music is such a wonderful way to learn language, as it makes it easy for children to absorb the rhythms and sounds of a language.  Plus it keeps learning fun, particularly important when teaching a a child who may not want to learn a language just because his parents think it’s a great idea!  In our experience lessons are learned best through play, especially with languages, since Monkey is often resistant to speaking Spanish.  But he loves music and so doesn’t mind what language it is in, as long as it is fun!

And this music definitely is fun — The themes are ones that speak to children: “Juguetes, jugetes, Yo quiero jugar. (Toys, toys, I want to play.)”  And what child wouldn’t agree that “no hay fiesta sin pastel (it’s not a party without cake)”?

The album features Spanish versions of a few classics that your children will already know – like “En el rancho de MacDonald” – but also new favorites.  My kids love “Caminemos en el Bosque/Let’s Walk Through the Woods” – which features a wolf howl!

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

The music itself is also the type that you can’t listen to sitting still. The songs are also lively and upbeat, and the lyrics are interactive, encouraging the listener to make animal noises, shout out a response, or sing along.

Singer-songwriter Jorge Anaya takes the listener on a journey through a fusion of different world music styles, such as cumbia, salsa, calypso, and merengue.  So not only is your child having fun, he is also absorbing some of the musical culture of Latin America along with the language.

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

As a non-native speaker, I really appreciate that the CD includes a booklet with the full lyrics, in English and Spanish.  But this feature had an added bonus that I hadn’t anticipated!  My reluctant Spanish speaker is also an emergent reader.  He loves to read anything he can get his hands on, and thanks to ¡Sabor! he now spends our car trips reading the album lyrics in Spanish!  Sometimes he reads it like a book (even when the music is off), and other times he reads it along with the music, exclaiming as he recognizes the words being sung.

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

I highly recommend this album, whether your children have already been exposed to Spanish or are just getting started.  It is a fun way to encourage Spanish learning even for the most reluctant speakers!  To see for yourself, you can listen to clips of the songs.  For more on this award-winning line of language learning materials (not just Spanish but French, too!), be sure to visit their website.  You can also follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Feb 172014
 

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

It’s funny how the things that should be the easiest to write are sometimes the most difficult.  I am woefully late in writing my monthly post for “Around the World in 12 Dishes,” the series in which each month participating bloggers travel the world with their kids by cooking a dish from another country and perhaps reading a book, doing a craft, or learning fun facts about it.  While this past month has been quite busy — with the MLK Day of Service Blog Hop, the Black History Blog Hop, and the Showing Kids Love Series — I can’t help but wonder if I was dragging my feet because I was just so nervous about writing about Perú.

Why nervous?  Because this is a part of the world very dear to my heart.  As much as I love my husband’s homeland of Costa Rica, South America was where, in a way, I started my journey to become the person I am today.  Of course, technically this journey started in Bolivia, not Perú, but the two countries have much in common, plus I did make an extended trip to Perú during the time I lived in Bolivia.  (Forgive the poor quality of my photos, taken nearly twenty years ago).

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

So you can see my hesitation at writing a post on this beautiful country.  My space here is limited, and my time to prepare this post even more so, so I already know from the start that what I write here will be inadequate to express the feeling of being in the Andes; the rush I felt the first time I saw those incredibly majestic mountains through the window of my bus; how when we finally reached the altiplano (highlands) the view reminded me of the surface of the moon; the way the beauty of that haunting music can hook into your soul; the poverty, yes, the desperate living conditions, yes, but also the warmth of the smiles, the richness of the culture and traditions, and the surprising diversity of the people.  (Side note for those of you who also grew up in the US – we are not the only diverse country in the world, no matter what we were taught in grade school!)

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

Performance by Baha’i youth from Sucre, Bolivia

My main memory of the food in Perú was actually of how different it was from what I had experienced in Bolivia.  To understand this, you must keep in mind that I was living at the time in the lowlands of eastern Bolivia, which is strikingly different from the highlands we typically think of.  In fact, culturally eastern Bolivia has more in common with neighboring Paraguay or even parts of Brazil.  The people are largely (and proudly) mestizo (mixed), though at the time I was there (mid-1990s) more and more of the indigenous from the highlands were migrating to the lowlands for economic reasons.

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

At a rest stop in the altiplano

Still, the food in eastern Bolivia was very different from the cuisine in the highlands of both Bolivia and Perú, which was again very different from what we sampled once we traveled over the Peruvian Andes and visited coastal Lima, known for its seafood and African influence.  Also keep in mind that at the time eastern Bolivia was just beginning to turn into the economic powerhouse it would soon become, thanks to the discovery of natural gas in the region.  The first McDonald’s was built there soon after I left, taken by everyone as a sign of things wonderful and modern to come.  (Another side note: Rumor had it that McDonald’s imported potatoes into Bolivia to make French fries – even though potatoes originated in this region!  Apparently these native crops were considered not uniform enough to make good French fries).

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

So when we arrived in Lima, fresh from our months in the less developed regions of Bolivia, it was hard not to be starry-eyed.  McDonald’s!  Pizza!  Tall buildings!  (I should add that we felt much the same way when we arrived in Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, which, for the record, had had McDonald’s for quite a long time).  Needless to say we (being young) were more interested in eating pizza and hamburgers than we were in eating traditional dishes, though I should say we did try these, too.  (I seem to recall olive sandwiches…)

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

Group of Baha’i youth from Bolivia, on our way to a conference in Lima, Peru. Who is that tall white girl in the back?

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

Eating pizza in Lima, Peru

So when I needed to pick a dish to make, I called on a good friend from Perú and asked for her advice.  She told me that most traditional dishes are not quick or easy to make.  They are flavorful dishes that require a lot of time and work – not easy to do with a preschooler!  Instead, she recommended making quinoa, that versatile, quintessential Andean grain.  She often makes a simple but delicious meal of this with her young daughter, adding in vegetables or meat as they choose.

Not having cooked much with quinoa before, I went in search of a recipe, and stumbled on a delightful website for Peruvian recipes: Perú Delights.  And the blog truly is a delight to look at – beautiful photos of mouth-watering dishes, some traditional and some with a modern twist.  I have several pinned to try another time, but what caught my eye was her recipe for sprouted quinoa milk.  I was skeptical that Monkey would try a quinoa dish, but he loves milk and alternative milks, so I thought this would be worth a try.  I love milk alternatives but had never heard of quinoa milk, so my curiosity was piqued!

I followed the original recipe closely, so I won’t repeat it here.  Monkey was most interested in sprouting the quinoa.  This is what it looks like after soaking overnight.

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

The sprouted quinoa

I definitely recommend using the spiced water – it really does add incredible flavor to the dish!

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

Getting ready to blend the quinoa with the spiced water

And if you are just starting to incorporate quinoa into your diet, I suggest straining the milk before drinking, though you quinoa lovers out there certainly don’t have to 😉

I really enjoyed this drink, though I couldn’t convince anyone else to try it.  I think, as so often is the case with quinoa, it is one of those things that you either love or you won’t even try.  But if you like quinoa or just are feeling adventurous, I would definitely try this.  It is a delicious alternative to milk, plus it’s super healthy!

Sprouted Quinoa Milk and Resources to Study about Peru - Alldonemonkey.com

cancioncitas-book-cover-smallest-imageFor our cultural exploration this month, I revisited materials sent to me by my amazing friend Daria.  She is a wonderful musician and an incredible resource on this part of the world (among others!).

She recently produced a album for children with music from this part of the world, also with an e-book (pictured at left).  The music, as always, is wonderful, and the book is full of information, but given in a colorful, fun format that is very accessible for children.  There are crafts and activities included as well – I’d like to try making the pan flute out of straws!

For more on quinoa, don’t miss this fascinating interview with the Quinoa Ambassador (did you know there was one??)  If you prefer, you can also read the original Spanish version.

What have you been exploring with your children lately?

 

 

Around the World in 12 DishesCheck out the other participating blogs to see what they have been cooking up:

Adventures In Mommydom, Afterschool for Smarty Pants, All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share, Maroc Mama, Creative World of Varya, Glittering Muffins, Kid World Citizen, Mermaids’ Makings, The Educators’ Spin On It and The Mommy Talks.

If you try a dish from Jamaica, we’d love to hear about it! And don’t forget to download this month’s placemat and passport! You can also link up your dish or craft here to share your post on all the participating blogs:



Jun 192013
 

Music from Childhood - World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.comWelcome to World Citizen Wednesday!

Each week we pose a question to members of the fabulous Multicultural Kid Blogs group and share their answers here.

To find out more about these amazing bloggers, check out the Multicultural Kid Blogs Facebook page and our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

This week we ask…

What music your family listen to when you were growing up?

Leanna of All Done Monkey: We listened to a lot of classical music, plus my mom loved John Denver, Simon & Garfunkel, Seals & Crofts, and Abba.

Niceno of Mixed Race is cool too: Seeing that am from the Caribbean … Reggae Music… Mostly Beres Hammond, Jimmy Cliff and Bob Marley.

Frances of Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Latin music! Salsa (Héctor Lavoe, Willie Colón, Raphy Leavitt) and Merengue! and of course, Disco! (The Bee Gees, Abba, Donna Summer). Funny enough, to this day that’s what I prefer to listen to.

Emma of Muslimas’ Oasis: The Doors, Van Morrison, Neil young, Tracy Chapman, The Eagles, The Topp Twins, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton … I guess rock and roll and country mostly. But we listened to all sorts. John Lennon too, The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Bon Jovi, The Band, Robbie Robertsons later Native American inspired stuff, Bob Marley. Mum listened to different stuff than Dad (they were separated) so it depended who we were with too. I still like a lot of the same stuff and then some.

Madre Exilio of Maternidad en 2 Lenguas: This a good question Leanna I grew up with my dad listening to Pink Floyd, Police and Phil Collins my mum to Boleros (romantic music in Spanish). You made me remember me good times!

Stephen of The Head of the Heard: My dad listened to Irish Country (aarrggh!) music and people like Roy Orbison. My mum was a Stones fan and also loved Motown. We didn’t actually have much music in the house except for Sunday mornings when my dad would take over the record player. One thing I definitely inherited from my dad was an inability to hold a note.

Tara of Tara Kamiya: Top 40, Motown hits, Hip Hop which was new genre at the time. I am 36.

Olga of The European Mama: The Beatles (still my favorite), Rolling Stones, classical music and opera (especially Mozart, Verdi, and Gilbert&Sullivan) American country music (especially Loretta Lynn and Patsy Kline), German “Folksmusik” (my father really did, I still feel traumatized by it), French chansons (Dalida, George Brassens, Ives Montand and Edith Piaff), Russian music (such as Bulat Okudzava), Italian music, fado, Mexican music… you name it, my father listened to it.

Cecilia of Spanglish House: Bolivian folk music, salsa, we (the kids) liked Menudo ha!, the Beatles, Abba. My brother and I loved classics from the 80’s (I still do). My baby brother listens a lot of classical music, so I have learned to appreciate classical music, just listening to him practicing his piano. I love music and dancing!

Carrie of Crafty Moms Share: My parents listened to soft rock like Barbara Streisand. My sister and I loved Shaun Cassidy (as did all the girls our age) and for the most part all the Top 40 music of the time.

Kat of Hapa Mom: 1960s commercials and classical music. Lots of Suzuki method!

Varya of Creative World of Varya: My husband grew up listening pretty much everything 70s and 80s. I grew up listening Russian pop and folk + Classical music and of course – Bollywood!

Kristen of Toddling in the Fast Lane: The Beatles, Paul Simon, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Sesame Street. My dad listened to a lot of new age, Celtic, and my grandma loved the three tenors. My parents were always so surprised that we kids liked their music.

Cordelia of Multilingual Mama: A lot of opera, music like fats domino and classical music. My older brothers introduced me to queen, Jgeils band, the police, pink floyd, Rolling Stones, etc.

World Citizen Wednesdays - Alldonemonkey.com

Thanks to all the bloggers who shared their answers here! You can read answers to earlier questions in our previous installments of World Citizen Wednesday, including tips for traveling with kids!

Find out more about these wonderful bloggers by visiting our Facebook page, subscribing to our Facebook feed, following us on Twitter, or following our group Pinterest board! On Twitter, you can also find us by using the hashtag #multiculturalkids. And now you can visit our new Multicultural Kid Blogs website!

http://toddlefast.blogspot.com/

Mar 102013
 
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop - Alldonemonkey.comHi, and welcome to the first ever Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop!
Don’t you love being in on something new? I love that feeling of getting to participate in something that is just starting, especially when I know it’s going to be great!

That’s how I feel about the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop! It’s a place where bloggers can share multicultural activities, crafts, recipes, and musings for our creative kids.  We can’t wait to see what  you have to share with us this time!

I am fortunate to be hosting this brand new blog hop with two of my favorite blogging buddies, Frances of Discovering the World through My Son’s Eyes and Jody of Mud Hut Mama.  We had a lot of fun chatting with each other as we worked out the details.  Since we are in three different time zones (West Coast USA, East Coast USA, and Malawi), often I would be just starting breakfast, as Frances was thinking towards lunch, and Jody was preparing dinner!

(A big thank you to Frances, who came up with this idea and put in the bulk of the work to make it happen!)

It’s very easy to participate!  Just follow these simple guidelines:

  • Be a sweetheart, and kindly follow your hostess and co-hostesses:
  • Follow us via email, Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook.  Please let us know you’re following us, and we will be sure to follow you back.
  • Link up any creative kids culture posts, on anything from language, culture, books, travel, food, crafts, playdates, activities, heritage, and holidays, etc. Please, link directly to your specific post, and no  giveaways, shops, stores, etc.  When you link up your blog will also be shared simultaneously on our co-hostesses websites. 🙂
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
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  • Please  grab the button code above and put it on your blog or the post you’re linking up. You can also add a text link back to this hop on your blog post.  Note: By sharing your link up on this blog hop you are giving us permission to feature your blog post with pictures,  and to pin your link up in our Creative Kids Culture Feature board on Pinterest.
  • Don’t be a stranger, and share some comment love! Visit the other links, and comment. Everyone loves comments!
  • The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop will go live on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month and run for a week. The following blog hop we will each feature posts from the previous link up.  If you’re featured, don’t forget to grab the button below:
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
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Since we are just getting started, this week we are featuring a post from each of the hostesses, as a way of introducing ourselves.

If you are just getting to know my blog, a good place to start is my ABC’s of Raising a World Citizen series, since it includes some of my favorite posts and resources from around the web.

Frances and Jody are two of my favorite bloggers (and buddies), so I had a really hard time deciding which of their posts to feature!

For Frances, I chose this post about the Spanish immersion classes her son just began.  It has been fascinating to follow Frances’ efforts to raise her son to be bilingual.  She has great insights to offer, and I really admire her persistence.

Spanish immersion classes - Discovering the World Through My Sons Eyes

For Jody, I chose this post about greetings among the Kaonde people of Zambia, where she worked in the Peace Corps.  One of the things I love about Jody’s blog is her insights about the local culture.  This post tells all about the beautiful way the Kaonde welcome people to their village.

 

Kaonde-Greetings-Mud-Hut-Mama

Now let’s see what you’ve been up to!



Jan 092013
 

The ABCs of Raising a World CitizenWelcome to day three of this special series from 60+ bloggers from the Kid Blogger Network, all focused on exploring child-related topics from A-Z!

Our focus is on the ABC’s of Raising A World Citizen, all about raising a child at home in the world, from language learning, books, and geography games, to talking about race and appreciating diversity!

For a list of all of the posts in the ABC’s of Raising a World Citizen, you can visit our main page.  For a full list of the blogs in this series, go to the ABC’s of… Main Page.

“The tabernacle of unity hath been raised; regard ye not one another as strangers. Ye are the fruits of one tree, and the leaves of one branch.” – Bahá’u’lláh

K is for…Kids

Teach Preschool - The Preschool Postcard Exchange

Teach Preschool

One of the most powerful ways you can interest your children in the wider world is by introducing them to other children.  As this post from Mud Hut Mama illustrates so beautifully, children are naturally drawn to each other, despite language and cultural barriers.  And here are some wonderful ideas from Teach Preschool about how to connect with kids who don’t speak your language.

So try introducing your children to a diverse group of playmates.  This will make a stronger impression on them than all the lessons you try to teach them.  You can try to find a local multicultural moms group, or an international club, or form one yourself.

Youcan also help your child form connections with children abroad, through activities like this fun preschool postcard exchange from Teach Preschool or participating in a programs like the wonderful Worldwide Culture Swap.

L is for…Language

Expat Since Birth - Which Language to Use?

Expat Since Birth

Readers of this blog know that we are raising our sons to be bilingual in Spanish and English.  There are as may different ways to do this as there are families, and just because you aren’t fluent in another language doesn’t mean you can’t give your child early exposure to other languages.  Simply helping them realize that there are other ways of speaking and communicating is mind-expanding to little ones.  Here is a great post from Kid World Citizen on using bilingual stories to expose your children to a foreign language (in this case Spanish), even if you aren’t a native speaker.

If your family is already multilingual (perhaps you and your spouse grew up speaking different languages), it can sometimes be hard to decide which language(s) to use when speaking to your children.  As Expat Since Birth notes, in the end you have to ignore all the advice and decide what is best for your family.  If you live in a country other than your birth country, she also has some great tips for encouraging your child to learn the local language.

Some parents worry that teaching their children more than one language will be confusing, especially when they hear bilingual children mixing their languages in their speech.  But Expat Since Birth cites research to reassure parents that it is normal for children to intermingle the languages (“code switching”) when they are still learning.

If you are thinking of teaching your children a second (or third!) language, here are some resources:Blogging Carnival on Bilingualism logo

M is for…Music

Elika Mahoney

Elika Mahoney

Growing up in a musical family with a piano teacher mother, music has always been an important part of my life, and it is something that my son and I have always enjoyed together.  I love to sing, and he loves to DANCE!  Kids are naturally drawn to music, and is wonderfully fun and tangible way for kids to relate to other places.  These days it is so easy to find good music from around the world, so take advantage of it to take your child about other cultures.

Here is a list of some of our favorite global music, and a review of one of our favorite multicultural artists (and mom), Elika Mahoney.

Another great resource is the amazing musician Daria, who not only has wonderful music albums but also loads of resources – including fun craft ideas – for parents and educators on her website.

N is for…Network

When setting out on any endeavor, it helps to have support of other like-minded folks.  If possible, seek out other parents who are also interested in raising their children to be world citizens.  I am lucky enough to have an amazing multicultural moms group in my area, but you can always start your own!  It’s a great way to meet people and to give your kids a set of diverse playmates.

Daria - Making Multicultural Music

Daria

And your support network doesn’t have to be limited to just those that live in your area.  As a blogger, I have had the bounty of getting to know many creative, thoughtful parents online, such as those of the remarkable Kid Blogger Network that is sponsoring this ABC’s series.  So many of the activities and crafts we do at home come from other members of this group!

I have also been blessed to be a part of organizing two multicultural blogger groups.  Multicultural Kid Blogs is a diverse group of parents who are also dedicated to raising world citizens.  They have been so supportive to me in my small attempts in this direction, and I am continually inspired by the work that they do.

The Baha’i Mom Blogs is another great organization that I am proud to be part of.  Though we are scattered around the world, one thing we all share is a desire to raise our children with spiritual values, including a recognition of the spiritual oneness of all humanity.

Finding the right support group for yourself may take some trial and error, but it is well worth the effort!

O is for…OpportunityPapayas at Costa Rican Farmer's Market - Alldonemonkey.com

So much of teaching your child about the world is taking advantage of opportunities that present themselves, some of which you may not have anticipated.  Perhaps you are out shopping, and you see an ethnic restaurant you had never noticed, or you have a chance meeting at the park with a family from another country.  For example, when we were traveling in Costa Rica this past summer, we discovered an amazing children’s museum and were able to make an educational experience out of a trip to the local farmer’s market.

If you are oriented towards being open to the world around you, you will be surprised at what you will discover!

A big thank you to all the bloggers who let us share their posts and pictures here!

ABC’s of…Mom Tips and Tricks

Check out these other great ABC’s series from the bloggers of the Kid Blogger Network:

Photobucket

For a full list of the ABC’s topics from the Kid Blogger Network, including School Activities, Learning Through Play, Literacy, and Arts and Crafts, go to the main ABC’s Series page or click on the image to the left.

Jan 012013
 
 January 1, 2013  Book Reviews, crafts, Education, family, food, multiculturalism, music, raising world citizens, recipes, travel, Worldwide Culture Swapper Linkup Comments Off on January Culture Swapper Is Live!

Culture Swapper BadgeWelcome to the Culture Swapper of the new year!  I am proud to be co-hosting the Worldwide Culture Swappers link up again this month, created and sponsored by Worldwide Culture Swap and co-hosted by myself and Kid World Citizen.

The monthly Worldwide Culture Swapper is a way for bloggers to share blog posts or photos about anything related to culture, geography, language, traditions, customs, etc. So if you are searching for new ideas for teaching your children about the world, this is the place to look!

Each month favorites will be highlighted on our website and Facebook page. In addition, we pin featured entries to our Raising Global Citizens board on Pinterest, so be sure to check it out!

Here are a few of our favorite posts from last month’s Culture Swapper (in addition to the ones featured during the month on our Facebook page).  In honor of the season, I have chosen to highlight posts related to holiday traditions from around the world.

Hartlyn Kids - Worldwide Culture Swapper

From TLC’s Christmas Decorations Around the World (on Hartlyn Kids)

Hartlyn Kids tells us how to incorporate other cultures into holiday festivities.

Boy Teacher Mama - Worldwide Culture Swapper

Boy Teacher Mama teaches us some fun Hanukkah math games.

World Travel Family- Worldwide Culture Swapper

We get a different perspective on the holidays from World Travel Family, as they adjust to Christmas in the tropics.

Thanks to everyone who shared in December’s Culture Swapper. We can’t wait to see what you’ll share this month!

And now on to this month’s Culture Swappers Link up….

The rules
  • Link up any family friendly activity, craft, recipe, articles and posts that say a bit about your nationality or one that you are learning about.
  • You can submit more than one link so come back throughout the month to share your activities.
  • By linking you are giving us permission to feature your activity on our website and Facebook page.
  • Please grab a Culture Swapper badge from the sidebar and put it somewhere on your blog (or add a text link to us in your post).
  • Sorry, no giveaways or shops.

A new Link up will start on the first day of every month.

Let’s see what you’ve been up to!


Dec 142012
 
 December 14, 2012  Baha'i, multiculturalism, music, raising world citizens Comments Off on Baha’i Mom Blogs Featured Website: Elika Mahoney

Elika MahoneyThis month on Bahá’í Mom Blogs, our friend Varya of Little Artists has written a lovely feature on member Elika Mahoney.  Elika is not only an incredibly talented musician and artists, she is also a passionate, generous person who touches the lives of everyone around her.  Read more on Bahá’í Mom Blogs:

Bahá’í Mom Blogs Featured Website: Elika Mahoney

 

Dec 022012
 

Culture Swapper BadgeI am proud to be co-hosting the Worldwide Culture Swappers link up again this month, created and sponsored by Worldwide Culture Swap and co-hosted by myself and Kid World Citizen.

The monthly Worldwide Culture Swapper is a way for bloggers to share blog posts or photos about anything related to culture, geography, language, traditions, customs, etc. So if you are searching for new ideas for teaching your children about the world, this is the place to look!

Each month favorites will be highlighted on our website and Facebook page. In addition, we pin featured entries to our Raising Global Citizens board on Pinterest, so be sure to check it out!

Here are a few of our favorite posts from last month’s Culture Swapper (in addition to the ones featured during the month on our Facebook page).

Mud Hut Mama - Worldwide Culture Swapper on Alldonemonkey.com

Mud Hut Mama tells us how to prepare for a wedding in Malawi.

Crafty Moms Share - Worldwide Culture Swapper on Alldonemonkey.com

Crafty Moms Share helps us remember the real Pocahontas and her culture through books and food.

Discovering the World Through My Son's Eyes - Worldwide Culture Swapper on Alldonemonkey.com

We travel to a Puerto Rican kitchen in this trip down memory lane with Discovering The World Through My Son’s Eyes.

Thanks to everyone who shared in November’s Culture Swapper. We can’t wait to see what you’ll share this month!

And now on to this month’s Culture Swappers Link up….

The rules
  • Link up any family friendly activity, craft, recipe, articles and posts that say a bit about your nationality or one that you are learning about.
  • You can submit more than one link so come back throughout the month to share your activities.
  • By linking you are giving us permission to feature your activity on our website and Facebook page.
  • Please grab a Culture Swapper badge from the sidebar and put it somewhere on your blog (or add a text link to us in your post).
  • Sorry, no giveaways or shops.

A new Link up will start on the first day of every month.

Let’s see what you’ve been up to!


Nov 302012
 

Daria - Songs for Merry Multicultural Mirth - Review on Alldonemonkey.comLooking for some great holiday music to enjoy with your kids?  How about a CD that takes you around the world with Christmas and Hanukkah songs from the US, Puerto Rico, Spain, and Germany?

My Monkey usually takes a while to warm up to new music, so when I popped in this new holiday CD from Daria, I wasn’t sure how he would react.  Soon, however, he was asking me to play  the “candle song” again, and we ended up listening to the CD over and over in the coming days.  In fact, it hasn’t come out of our CD player since!

But wait, you say: There are so much holiday music out there! 

What makes this CD so special?

First is Daria herself.  This talented musician is not only celebrated around the world for her songs but also for her heart and her dedication to empowering kids through music.  Her website is devoted to sharing multicultural activities with children, parents, and educators.  For example, we have used her site to learn how to make our own drums, and now you can even learn how to say “Happy Holidays” in multiple languages!

Daria - Songs for Merry Multicultural Mirth - Review on Alldonemonkey.comThen, of course, there is the music.  This CD is just plain fun, not something “educational” you put on when you’re trying to impart a little culture to your child.  Yes, they will listen to music from other cultures, and yes, they will hear languages other than English, but chances are they will be having too much fun to notice!

Daria recorded the CD with two of her regular percussionists, Mike Beck and Tony Mascaro.  They had fun adding extra touches to each song to make it special, such as the real wooden castanets on “Ocho Candelikas” and the wonderful harmonies on “Jingle Bells.”  Daria herself sings the lead on all the songs as well as playing the rhythm guitar.

Since most of us do not speak as many languages as Daria, she is careful to include English verses in each of the songs, in some cases her own translations.

One of the things I love about this CD is that it is such a nice mix of classics I already knew (such as “Feliz Navidad”) and songs I had never heard before (such as the Spanish Hanukkah melody “Ocho Candelikas,” sung in the original Ladino).  Also, the album includes a variety of rhythms and moods. The rollicking “Jingle Bells,” for example, really captures the “holiday spirit of fun, enthusiasm and joy,” while the lovely German carol “Ihr Kinderlein Kommet” reflects the sense of wonder Daria herself felt about the Nativities she had seen throughout her life.

I heartily recommend this album as a way to get into the spirit of the season at the same time as you open the world up to your child.

For more on Merry Multicultural Mirth:

You can read the full liner notes or get a sneak preview of the songs.  You can purchase the CD on iTunes, Amazon, or from Daria’s store.

Daria - Merry Multicultural Mirth Review on Alldonemonkey.com

For more on Daria:

Visit her website, store, or blog.

 

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