Mar 162018
 
 March 16, 2018  bilingualism, Spanish 2 Responses »

Are you teaching your child to speak Spanish? Here are some ideas on how to help him with his pronunciation in Spanish and some general thoughts about when and how to do so. Share your own tips in the comments, and don’t miss an exclusive discount code for a fun new product to help with Spanish language learning!

Disclosure: I received a complimentary set of flashcards from Linguacious for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you. 

Pronunciation in Spanish: Tips for Helping Your Child

One challenge of teaching your child to speak Spanish is helping her to pronounce the words correctly. Especially if you start when your child is older, but even if you start when they are young but they are immersed in an English-speaking culture, pronunciation in Spanish will inevitably present some difficulties. Yet there are some simple ways you can help!

But first, some general cautions:

Multilingual Parenting has an excellent article on whether to correct your bilingual child’s language. As a parent and educator, our relationship with our child is much different than that of a teacher and student in a traditional classroom. She cautions strongly against constantly correcting your child, instead focusing on encouraging them when they use language correctly. As she often reiterates on her blog, as a parent you also must focus on your relationship with your child as well as the child’s long-term enthusiasm for learning the language.

So be careful about when and whether to correct your child’s pronunciation in Spanish. As a general rule, the more self-conscious they feel when they speak, the less enjoyable it will be for them and the less they will want to continue.

If you are a homeschooler, you may be at a slight advantage because your child is used to seeing you as a teacher who will be providing instruction in Spanish as in other subjects such as math and history. As a result, when you are in “class mode,” they may be more open to having direct help with pronunciation.

And now, for some fun ideas to help with your child’s pronunciation in Spanish – sometimes without them even realizing it!

1. Rhymes

Rhymes are a great way to help with a child’s pronunciation in Spanish, as they must attend to the sounds of the words and listen carefully for similar sounds. Here are some printable rhyming words, including links to traditional rhymes in Spanish.

2. Music

Using music to teach Spanish works on so many levels – it’s fun, it teaches culture, and – it’s great for pronunciation! Music often contains repetition of important words and phrases, and children often “get” pronunciation better when it is set to music. Again, it is a way of encouraging them to really listen to the sounds in words. Spanish Playground also has some wonderful hand-clapping games that work to teach pronunciation in a similar way. You can also find cute musical videos to help teach pronunciation.

3. Focus on Syllables

Spanish letters have much more uniform sounds than in English, which can be really helpful when teaching pronunciation in Spanish! When children really understand how Spanish syllables are pronounced, it makes it easy for them to confront long and more complex vocabulary later on. So try breaking the language down into syllables and help teach pronunciation using tools like this printable syllable wheel. Clapping activities can help them learn where to put the correct stress.

4. Mouth Exercises

Did you know that you can actually do simple mouth exercises with your child to help them with their pronunciation? Here is an article by a speech language pathologist on mouth exercises that help with clear speech. It includes a special note on the Italian “r,” which is similar to the Spanish “r.”

5. About those “R’s”

If there is any aspect of pronunciation in Spanish that gives a child trouble, it is sure to be that rolled “r”! (The flipped “r” is a bit tricky as well but easier to teach and correct). Here is a collection of ideas from parents and educators on how to help kids to roll their “r’s” – although the main message is to not worry about it too much, as even native speakers have trouble with this when they’re young!

6. Exposure to Native Speakers

For me, one of the most important things you can do to help your child with his pronunciation in Spanish is to expose him as much as possible to the speech of native speakers. The more he hears the language, the more his ear will become accustomed to it and the more natural the correct pronunciation will sound to him. And while it may take him a while to be able to replicate the sounds himself, this is a small challenge compared to those children who simply don’t know how words should be pronounced or who cannot remember because of lack of exposure.

If you are not a native speaker yourself or even if you don’t speak Spanish, there are still many ways you can make sure your child is exposed to the speech of native speakers. And even if you are a native speaker, it can be very helpful for your child to listen to other native speakers as well, so they can hear other accents and listen to vocabulary and speech patterns you perhaps don’t use as much.

Obviously, if you have friends or relatives who are native speakers, take advantage of this wonderful opportunity for interaction. If you don’t have access to native speakers your child can meet face to face, you can still listen to Spanish language radio, Spanish music, and Spanish language media.

And I’m also excited to introduce you to a brand-new way to reinforce correct pronunciation in Spanish: through these wonderful new flash cards from Linguacious!

You may think, what do flash cards have to do with pronunciation?

These well-made flash cards (available in dozens of other languages as well) were developed by PhD linguists and tested by real families. There are many different games you can play with them, so it is a fun way to learn and practice vocabulary in the target language. The photos are clear and colorful and help kids learn practical vocabulary.

But what my kids really love is that you can scan a QR code on each card and hear the pronunciation! This is wonderful for tech-loving kids, but also for parents who aren’t native speakers themselves. You know your child is being exposed to the correct pronunciation in Spanish by a native speaker!

We sampled the Around the Home flashcard set. There is also an Animals flashcard set, plus a set of 3 posters of favorite animals and objects, also with audio!

I highly recommend this for anyone teaching their child Spanish. Try it yourself, with the exclusive discount code ADMONKEY for 10% off your Amazon order, good through April 31, 2018!

Jul 242017
 
 July 24, 2017  bilingualism, Education, Spanish Comments Off on Teaching a Second Language with Montessori

I have always been intrigued by the Montessori method. I loved its gentleness, focus on hands-on learning, and emphasis on learning about other cultures. What you may not know is that Montessori is also a wonderful way of teaching a second language! Here are some great resources for teaching your child another language using Montessori. Share your experiences in the comments!

Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of the Montessori Inspiration at Home bundle for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a commission at no extra charge to you.

Teaching a Second Language with Montessori | Alldonemonkey.com

Teaching a Second Language with Montessori

The Montessori method of teaching a second language follows the general Montessori principles of starting early, trusting your child, and following their interests. So the focus is on providing a stimulating environment in the second language with activities that interest them, allowing them to experiment and try on their own, and not pushing them to activities they do not want to do. (As any bilingual parent will tell you, not following the last rule will turn most kids off learning the new language!)

If you are considering Montessori but aren’t sure where to begin here are some great resources to get you started, including an AMAZING one you won’t want to miss!

A bilingual Montessori homeschool setup

Tons of bilingual Montessori printables

Raising multilingual Montessori kids

Raising a bilingual child the Montessori way

Montessori Inspiration at Home - Toddler Series

I am thrilled to share with you the Montessori Inspiration at Home Toddler series, now on sale! This is an amazing resource for those interested in teaching a second language with Montessori or anyone wanted to use the Montessori method to teach their little ones. The bundle pack includes the new Language book (which just launched on July 19) and the earlier Practical Life Skills book (both of which can also be purchased separately).

Montessori Inspiration at Home: Language is designed for caregivers who want to nurture their toddler’s language development. The 100+ pages of ideas are so easy to follow, with simple instructions, printables, and photos – perfect even if you have little background in the Montessori method. The 12 chapters give you a basic background in Montessori as well as activities to build those pre-reading and pre-writing skills, plus crossing the midline, sound games, the 3-period lesson, teaching a second language, and more!

There are over 200 pages of printable resources, including materials in Spanish! So if you are working to create a stimulating, bilingual environment for your child, you won’t want to miss this!

I love how easy the Montessori Inspiration at Home Toddler series makes it to get started with Montessori. It gives you all the tools you need and equips you with the confidence to do it! As soon as I started reading, I felt so inspired about my own homeschooling and how I can adapt it to use the Montessori method with my little ones. I highly this incredible resource as a way to educate yourself and your child, especially if you are interested in teaching a second language with Montessori.

Montessori Inspiration at Home Bundle SALE

And if you get your copy by July 26, 2017, you can more than 50% offDon’t miss this opportunity – get your copy today!

Feb 272017
 
 February 27, 2017  bilingualism Comments Off on Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft

I barely played video games growing up and even as an adult never found them very entertaining, at least, not compared to reading a book or, you know, hanging out with real live people or feeling the sunshine on my face. Yet my children love them and so I have come to appreciate video games as fun and often brain-building activities. I have even logged some time playing their favorite, Minecraft, though I have no idea what I am doing! It is quite humbling to have your 4 year old sigh as he explains something to you again. It seemed an apt metaphor for bilingual parenting, which is also incredibly challenging but rewarding. Here are the ways I have discovered that bilingual parenting is like Minecraft.

Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft | Alldonemonkey.com

Z Is for Zombie: How Bilingual Parenting Is Like Minecraft

– Often the world you are operating in can seem very surreal.

– You find yourself doing things you never thought you would.

– You can still have lots of fun even if most of the time you don’t know what is going on.

– Some days everyone is building together peacefully (Creative Mode), while other days you’re being attacked constantly by strange creatures (Survival Mode).

– Your children often understand more than you do.

– You don’t really need a lot of gear, but it can help, though the wide range of choices can be confusing.

– You find yourself using vocabulary (like “OPOL” or “creeper”) that your pre-child self wouldn’t recognize.

– Some days you’re just happy if you know what your children are saying.

– You try to act like you’re the one in charge, but eventually you realize that you are part of a world your kids have created and you all have to work together if you want to accomplish anything.

– You are more likely to build something amazing (or survive attacks) if you have others helping you.

– Sometimes everything is going great, but other times you are surrounded by creatures (your children or nay sayers) that explode if you even look at them.

– You are humbled by how much you have left to learn, at the same time as you are proud of what you have managed to accomplish.

– Every day is an adventure that challenges your creativity and endurance, but that in the end is always worth it.

the piri-piri lexicon

This post is part of the month-long series A-Z of Raising Multilingual Parenting, from the piri-piri lexicon. Be sure to stop by and see some of the other articles in this incredible collection about bilingual parenting!

Sep 272016
 
 September 27, 2016  bilingualism, Literacy, Spanish 2 Responses »

One of the most important ways we are passing on Hispanic heritage to our children is through teaching them Spanish. Helping them learn to read in Spanish (biliteracy) is a wonderful way to motivate them to continue learning the language, plus it is a great way to bond and show cariño to your kids!

Biliteracy: Why It Matters for Your Bilingual Child | Alldonemonkey.com

What is biliteracy and why does it matter for your bilingual child? If you are like me, you have had many moments of feeling frustrated and perhaps downright discouraged about your efforts to raise your children to be bilingual. It takes much more work than you realized, and you’ve learned a lot of lessons along the way. But at the end of the day you are left wondering exactly how much Spanish your children have absorbed, and whether they will ever speak more than a few scattered phrases.

We started our bilingual journey with the best of intentions, and it is clear that our children understand most of what is said to them in Spanish. Yet if we wanted it to go beyond passive bilingualism (where they understand but don’t speak the language), it was clear that we needed to up our game.

And so we have been focusing on teaching our children to read in Spanish. Our family loves to sit down together over a healthy breakfast and read, so now I make sure to pick out books in Spanish! Reading together in Spanish is not only great family bonding time, it also helps children really understand the language. 

Biliteracy, or being literate in two languages, is fundamental to turning passive bilinguals into active learners. Here is why it is worth the effort:

Biliteracy: Why It Matters for Your Bilingual Child

Learning to read in another language…

…builds confidence. Sometimes bilingual children are actually more nervous to speak Spanish than a child encountering it for the first time. They know enough to know how much they don’t know! They know how the language should sound but not enough to speak it that way themselves. As one US born child once said to his Costa Rican mother, “Mom, me siento weird when I speak Spanish.” (“Mom, I feel weird when I speak Spanish.”) Gaining a new skill helps build their confidence in the language.

…slows the language down for them. Encountering the stream of spoken language can be overwhelming if you struggle to understand many of the words. When you read you can go at your own pace, even looking up words if you need to. It can also spark many “aha!” moments, especially since Spanish has so many cognates in English. These connections are often more obvious in the written language than spoken, such as “idea” which is written the same way in both languages but pronounced differently.

…actively engages the child with the language. Rather than just passively listening and then responding in English, reading forces the child to focus on the words, saying them either out loud or in their heads. This is actually a profound shift, as they are really paying attention to the language in a very new and more active way.

Biliteracy: Why It Matters for Your Bilingual Child | Alldonemonkey.com

…expands vocabulary. As great as your own vocabulary is in the language, your child will run across many new words in books. This is a real boon for non-native speakers like myself, since I tend to use one word for a concept (for example, escribir, to write), when of course there are actually several ways to say the same thing (apuntar, anotar, numerar, copiar…).

…teaches grammar. When a child sees the words on the page, it is often easier for them to understand exactly what is being spoken and how sentences are constructed in the target language.

…opens up a world of literature. Once your child really begins to find his feet with reading in the language, he will have access to a whole world of literature, including favorite books (and comics!) that you may have grown up with.

…shares heritage and culture. So much of heritage and culture is passed down in books, whether Don Quixote or Mafalda. While of course you may also end up reading translations of their favorite books from English at first, as they gain confidence and interest, you can introduce them to other books as well.

…encourages togetherness. Just as anytime when a child begins to read, it is a team effort and can lead to some really sweet bonding time as you explore together. My favorite times of day are when we read together over breakfast (or sometimes my oldest reads to his brother!).

I love how easy it is to give my kids a healthy breakfast with Cheerios! I know I’m giving them something good for them that they’ll both enjoy, plus it leaves me more time for snuggling up with them to read. Cheerios also makes a great snack to fuel homework time!

If you want more time to sit down with your kids over breakfast, visit Cereal con cariño, where you can watch fun videos, download cereal recipes you can do with your kids, and download a $1 OFF coupon for General Mills Cereal! For those in California and Texas, you can also find out about events General Mills is sponsoring in your area.

Mar 112016
 
 March 11, 2016  bilingualism, Spanish 10 Responses »

7 Ways to Teach Your Kids Spanish Even If You Don't Speak It | Alldonemonkey.com

Have you seen all the articles on the importance of teaching your kids another language but feel frustrated because you feel you aren’t fluent enough to do this?  Maybe your child’s school doesn’t offer foreign language classes, or perhaps your child is lucky enough to be enrolled in one and you would like to know how you can support it at home.  This article is for you!  Here are 7 simple ways you can teach your kids Spanish – even if you don’t speak it!

Find even more ideas on my Spanish for Kids Pinterest board!

Please note that I am not trying to diminish the importance of qualified Spanish teachers.  Far from it.  I’m merely acknowledging the fact that not all children have access to Spanish classes, or they do but their parents aren’t sure how they can support this language learning at home.

Disclosure: I was sent a complimentary copy of ¡Hola! Let’s Learn Spanish! for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you.

7 Ways to Teach Your Kids Spanish Even If You Don’t Speak It

1. Ask the Experts

If your child has a Spanish teacher and you’d like to support their work at home, just ask!  This may seem obvious, but often we forget to simply ask the teacher what you can do at home to reinforce what your child is learning at school.  If your child is not enrolled in a program, you can contact a local school or look online for resources.  Two of my go-to websites are Mommy Maestra and Spanish Playground, both of which include materials for a range of abilities.

Related Post: Top Homeschool Resources for Teaching Spanish

2. Read Bilingual Books

Bilingual Board Books | Alldonemonkey.com

Reading bilingual books is one of the best ways to learn Spanish along with your child!  For example, these wonderful bilingual board books teach simple vocabulary that kids and adults can easily learn. (We love Counting With / Contando Con Frida, shown above).

I adore this article on how to use bilingual books to teach “un poquito” español with books like My Way/A mi manera, even you have a very basic understanding yourself.  She has great tips on how to get the most out of this experience!

This year I've really been working on increasing my kids' exposure to Spanish and trying to connect them to the written language. One way to do this that they really enjoy is reading beautiful bilingual picture books like My Colors, My World / Mis colores, mi mundo by one of my favorite authors, Maya Christina Gonzalez. In this award winning book, a young girl shares the colors she sees in her home, from the brown of the desert sand to the orange of the marigolds. Lovely story to share anytime but especially now for Hispanic Heritage Month, which is just starting! Be sure to visit @ABoyarshinov for another great #picturebookoftheday recommendation! #mkbkids #kbn #momsoninstagram #kidbloggersofig #kidlit #hispanicheritage #hhm #mkbhhm #bilingual #bilingualbooks

A photo posted by Leanna || Parenting Blogger (@alldonemonkey) on

One interesting approach for older kids is that used in the well intentioned book ¡hola! Let’s Learn Spanish POD: Visit New Places and Make New Friends, which I was recently sent to review.  The story is mainly in English, with Spanish words gradually sprinkled in.  Through repetition and context, the reader is able to understand the meanings and begin to incorporate the vocabulary.  The book also includes fun activities to practice the new vocabulary and learn more about the culture of Mexico.

While I admire the purpose of the book and its pedagogy, I can’t fully recommend it because its main story relies on stale images of Mexico as a place of sombreros and jumping beans.   As stated in this wonderful article about moving beyond cultural stereotypes of Mexico, it’s not that there’s anything wrong with these images, just that we need to look deeper to see the richness and variety of the culture, particularly when teaching children who may not have been exposed to authentic Mexican culture before.

3. Listen to Music in Spanish

Music is such a fun way to teach your kids Spanish!  Not only do kids learn the rhythms and sounds of a language, moving to music is great for active learners like mine.  We really love ¡A Bailar! Let’s Dance! from Whistlefritz as well as Mister G, especially Los Animales, and I dare you not to sing along to the title track on Chocolalala!  (Read my full reviews here and here).  Great music and great language learning! 

Related Post: 3 Easy Ways to Use Music to Teach Preschool Spanish

4. Watch Spanish Language Videos

Another fun way to teach your kids Spanish is through watching videos together.  Whistlefritz has great DVDs like Spanish for Kids: Vamos a Jugar. We also love Little Pim: Let’s Eat – Spanish For Kids.  (Read my full review of Little Pim).  And don’t forget that these days most DVDs let you select the language track, so try setting videos to Spanish.  Watching a favorite movie can be a very snuggly way to learn together!

5. Create a Support Network

Keep yourself motivated by creating a support network of other families who are teaching their kids Spanish.  These could be other parents from your child’s class or those you meet through a moms’ group or hanging out at the library!  You could also look for local homeschooling groups or search online to see if there is an existing group.  If not, your local library may be able to host a get together of interested parents.

Related Post: Starting a Multicultural Moms Group

6. Find an Immersion Program

Many areas offer immersion programs during the summer, which can be an invaluable way to really teach your kids Spanish by surrounding them with native speakers and other Spanish students.  I have not tried Concordia Language Villages, but it is a well known program of immersion camps.  (They offer them for adults, too!)  You may even be able to find a local program such as the one described by this mother.

7. Travel!

I can’t emphasize enough how much travel motivates children (and parents) to learn another language by making it more fun and relevant.  It also creates very positive associations for them that will keep them interested in learning, plus it helps them place the language within a larger cultural context that will make language learning more meaningful.

Above all, know that what you are doing matters!  Every bit of exposure to another language is helpful.  Even if you aren’t fluent yourself, you are still giving your child a tremendous advantage in their own language learning plus you are showing them how much you value learning another language by making an effort alongside them.  Keep it up, and share your tips in the comments!

For even more ideas, check out this great article on learning Spanish with your kids!

Aug 192015
 
 August 19, 2015  bilingualism 4 Responses »

Raising Multilingual Kids: Can a Non-Native Speaker Raise Bilingual Children? | Alldonemonkey.com

When it comes to raising bilingual children, many non-native speakers (such as myself!) are plagued with doubts.  How well can we really teach our children a second language?

In the beginning, my husband and I used the One Parent One Language method.  In other words, he – as a native Spanish speaker – would speak to our son only in Spanish, and I – as a native English speaker – would speak to our son only in English (read more about language learning methods).

But eventually found that this method was not very successful for our family.  As a result, when our second child was born, we switched tactics and I began speaking more Spanish at home, especially to the little one.  And while this heavier concentration on our minority language is more successful, it does raise the question of how helpful it is to have a non-native speaker teaching the kids a second language.

So based on my experiences – and my observations of other families – do I think a non-native speaker can raise bilingual children?  Go to the video below to find out!

Can a Non-Native Speaker Raise Bilingual Children?

Question from Kid World Citizen

This post is part of this year’s Vlogging Telephone from Multicultural Kid Blogs.  Here’s how it works: think of it like a big chain, where one blogger asks a question, to be answered by the next blogger, who asks another question to be answered by the next blogger, and so on!  All of the questions are related to a topic, which this year is Raising Multilingual Kids.  (If you missed it, be sure to check out last year’s Vlogging Telephone on Travel with Kids!)

The question I’m answering above is from Kid World Citizen.  To follow the chain, visit the piri-piri lexicon to find out how she responds to my question: “What do you do when you meet resistance from your child to learning/speaking another language?”

 

Dec 052014
 
 December 5, 2014  bilingualism, Kid Fun, music 11 Responses »

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

I received a complimentary copy of ¡Sabor! for review purposes; however, all opinions are my own.

Raising our children to be bilingual is important to us, and we are always looking for fun ways to encourage language learning.   So I was thrilled to receive a copy of the ¡Sabor! – a CD of Spanish learning songs from Whistlefritz – to review.

Music is such a wonderful way to learn language, as it makes it easy for children to absorb the rhythms and sounds of a language.  Plus it keeps learning fun, particularly important when teaching a a child who may not want to learn a language just because his parents think it’s a great idea!  In our experience lessons are learned best through play, especially with languages, since Monkey is often resistant to speaking Spanish.  But he loves music and so doesn’t mind what language it is in, as long as it is fun!

And this music definitely is fun — The themes are ones that speak to children: “Juguetes, jugetes, Yo quiero jugar. (Toys, toys, I want to play.)”  And what child wouldn’t agree that “no hay fiesta sin pastel (it’s not a party without cake)”?

The album features Spanish versions of a few classics that your children will already know – like “En el rancho de MacDonald” – but also new favorites.  My kids love “Caminemos en el Bosque/Let’s Walk Through the Woods” – which features a wolf howl!

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

The music itself is also the type that you can’t listen to sitting still. The songs are also lively and upbeat, and the lyrics are interactive, encouraging the listener to make animal noises, shout out a response, or sing along.

Singer-songwriter Jorge Anaya takes the listener on a journey through a fusion of different world music styles, such as cumbia, salsa, calypso, and merengue.  So not only is your child having fun, he is also absorbing some of the musical culture of Latin America along with the language.

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

As a non-native speaker, I really appreciate that the CD includes a booklet with the full lyrics, in English and Spanish.  But this feature had an added bonus that I hadn’t anticipated!  My reluctant Spanish speaker is also an emergent reader.  He loves to read anything he can get his hands on, and thanks to ¡Sabor! he now spends our car trips reading the album lyrics in Spanish!  Sometimes he reads it like a book (even when the music is off), and other times he reads it along with the music, exclaiming as he recognizes the words being sung.

Spanish Learning Songs for Kids: Whistlefritz CD Review | Alldonemonkey.com

I highly recommend this album, whether your children have already been exposed to Spanish or are just getting started.  It is a fun way to encourage Spanish learning even for the most reluctant speakers!  To see for yourself, you can listen to clips of the songs.  For more on this award-winning line of language learning materials (not just Spanish but French, too!), be sure to visit their website.  You can also follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Jun 302014
 

The Language Story of the Creative Mom: Bilingual Kids Rock Podcast interview

I am so pleased today to share the interview I did recently with Olena of Bilingual Kids Rock.  She has an amazing podcast series, interviewing parents from around the world who are raising their kids to be bilingual.  In our interview we talk about religion, choosing which language learning system to use, learning Spanish while residing in Bolivia, switching languages when speaking to adults and a whole lot more.  Listen to the interview on Bilingual Kids Rock – we’d love to hear what you think!

The Language Story of the Creative Mom: Bilingual Kids Rock Podcast Interview

Feb 192014
 

Book Review: My Way - A mi manera - Lynn ReiserToday I am so happy to be posting for my good friend at Toddling in the Fast Lane.  I am so impressed by all the bilingual learning activities she does with her daughter, so I am happy to share about a bilingual book we discovered lately.

Read all about it over at Kristen’s fabulous blog:

A Mi Manera: Book Review

And be sure to also visit my collaborative Pinterest board on Bilingualism!


Dec 102013
 

How I Motivate My Resistant Preschooler to Speak a Second Language - Alldonemonkey on What to Expect

I have written at length about our efforts to raise our son to be bilingual and the lessons we have learned along the way.  Now that Monkey is almost four, we have come up with some new strategies to deal with the common problem of resistance to learning a second language.

I am so pleased to be able to share these ideas on the wonderful website related to the best-selling parenting series, What to Expect!   You can read the full article on the What to Expect website:

How I Motivate My Resistant Preschooler to Speak a Second Language

You can find even more ideas on my Bilingualism Pinterest board.

 Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop

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